Haiti now & the future

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Haiti now & the future

Postby smitty on Sun Jan 29, 2012 7:31 pm

My best friend is a home builder. He did not see the possible recovery of Haiti with three Mayors that are claiming they are THE MAYOR.

I told him some of the people were pleased at having their floors 2" higher then in previous floods, but really 2" is beans all when there is a flood.

One can see the main thing missing is water & people are stealing from other tents, to street fighting.

I noted one gentleman was in charge of a lot to be done & pointed to one of the thousands of tents & said "if you walked into that tent you would NOT see a toilet or cooking utilities" then went on about they would make it different.

The same gentleman wanted to see how the gravel & cement mix was comming along. to note this one chap with a maze of rocks in his shovel about to go in a pail. We have the French speaking to English speaking to he said tell him to get rid of the rocks for this is the main reason so many places collapsed was to many rocks in the concret.

Once he turned away the chap with the shovel turned to the right to dig up more gravel along with rocks & dumped some of the powder cement on the gravel & rocks he was digging up, I have had a power driven cement mixer & that was used to the base of the 8' high mesh fences & it worked well.

When really pressed I have not used a small pail, but a large wheelbarrow & it did work with a bit of a mess.

I noted two chap with normal wooden saws on each end of this 6" by 6" bit of lumber. One was doing it the correct way while the opposit on the other end was doing it the very oppisite, in reaching to PULL down the handle close to his side & legs. My friend simply shook his head & said THERE IS NOT A HOPE.
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Re: Haiti now & the future

Postby CielOnTap on Tue May 07, 2013 7:40 pm

The Big Truck That Went By by Jonathan Katz sums up the situation prior to, during and efforts done after the earthquake.

In Haiti, the truck reference means the vibration caused by a passing water truck. Lots of Haiti's buildings were built right to the roadside, so passing trucks were noteworthy for loudness.

The author used the truck reference to indicate what his first impression of the first shake by the quake was.

He mentions how media in Haiti rely on local fixers-men who can drive journalists to sites where the news/action is happening, arrange supplies/suppliers and knows who to call for information. There are channels in Haiti known as the radio and tv stations but most Haitians rely on word of mouth known as "canal djol" that spreads quickly and is more relied upon than official channels.

In the months following the quake, a Haitian minister had commented how Canada did not give the government money. The author said all the aid groups who came to Haiti took accountability of their donations/monies provided to obtain supplies and labour needed to give assistance to the Haitians needing medical, food, shelter and funeral needs covered. That money did not go the government. In many cases, aid groups tended to buy supplies from vendors in their own countries prior to heading out to Haiti. When the aid groups left, the government infrastructure had not caught up or even entered into existence.

Another thing that affected the distribution of aid--no Haitian authority was in charge of coordinating all of the foreign aid arriving at the airport. Remember how food biscuit boxes were stuck for days in warehouses because transportation and information and roads were hard to find?

The author noted how some Haitians worked their service arrangements to favour themselves monetarily and at the risk of others. One man who supplied diesel for the vehicle used by the journalist was discovered to have been padding the fuel fee when the journalist was doing his expense report for his employer. A Haitian contractor that was to pump out latrines at the UN base did not choose a designated spot that prevented water contamination--the employees dumped water in a pit that worsened river water conditions so residents had the smell to deal with and had to buy water. In addition, there was a health condition spread by leaking UN waste pipes into the river that lead to illness, deaths and a really long delay by the UN to acknowledge that UN soldiers from a particular country that had that illness had brought it along and the wastewater contamination affected swimmers and residents using the river.

The Haitian president had gone to the March meeting in New York City where other countries' leaders had mostly determined what was going to be done in Haiti for reconstruction and who was going to lead the effort. The president was basically a spectator though he had tried to alert his audience of some realities that he was aware of. Another example of outsiders running the reconstruction efforts: aid groups had meetings in Haiti that were conducted in English and most Haitians speak Creole, thus were shut out of contributing their ideas for ways to bring the country back into normalcy.

How many of us knew that Haiti had debts centuries ago (from the 17th century) related to loans to payoff sugar plantation destruction that kept the country broke? Before the 20th century leaders who used the treasury as their own personal banking accounts?
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Re: Haiti now & the future

Postby deja vu on Sat Oct 04, 2014 3:05 pm

Jean-Claude Duvalier, the self-proclaimed "president for life" of Haiti whose corrupt and brutal regime sparked a popular uprising that sent him into a 25-year exile, died Saturday of a heart attack, his attorney said.

The 63-year-old ex-leader died at a private residence in Port-au-Prince where he had been staying, attorney Reynold Georges said.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/jean-claud ... -1.2787874

Haitian President Michel Martelly expressed his condolences to the ex-dictator's family, making no mention of the widespread human rights abuses that occurred during the Duvalier era.

"On behalf of the entire government and people of Haiti, I take this sad occasion to extend my sincere sympathies to his family, his relatives and his supporters across the country," Martelly said.



How could anyone have sympathy for this man after the hell he put Haitian citizens through. A brutal man who should have been in jail not exile for his crimes. The President would have been better to say nothing instead of expressing sympathy to the family, a family who bred two horrific dictators and lived the high live while the people suffered under their rule.
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Re: Haiti now & the future

Postby CielOnTap on Sun Oct 05, 2014 2:01 pm

The death of a former countryman who caused much misery is going to create a grieving period for the adults who had to live through his time in the country's government and witness others' suffering because of him. It may be a year or so before such experiences surface in North American press publications.

The current president likely had to acknowledge the other person's passing but yes, it can be debated whether he had to extend his sympathies to the deceased man's relatives, given the history. Maybe a simple "someone from Haiti's history has passed away today" would have done the task.
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Re: Haiti now & the future

Postby CielOnTap on Sun Oct 16, 2016 3:42 pm

Haitians have been commenting this week that aid seems not to be coming forth
unless the Haitians themselves are doing rebuilding or burying the dead after
Hurricane Matthew dealt the west coast with devastating effect. Also there's a matter
of official death counts not including those swept out to the water during
the hurricane. Government officials have their way of counting the dead.
Surviving family members who know where their dead were buried them
as soon as they could, so those dead don't get into official counts too.
So it seems good that the finance minister announced a government commission was taking charge of both relief and reconstruction from Hurricane Matthew, deemed the worst disaster to hit the country since the 2010 earthquake.

“The commission will decide with the international community what must be done. Aid must be co-ordinated,” Yves Romain Bastien told the country’s leading newspaper, Le Nouvelliste.

“The response that all of our partners want to give, it is us, the government, who will tell them where we have needs,” concurred Prime Minister Enex Jean-Charles, according to the Miami Herald.

What is yet to be seen is whether short-term co-ordination is possible, given the scope of the damage in remote areas that remain without cellphone reception and are unreachable by washed-out bridges and broken roads. Mourad Wahba, the UN’s humanitarian co-ordinator, said in a statement at least 350,000 people need “urgent assistance.”

https://www.thestar.com/news/world/2016/10/07/lessons-of-haiti-quake-crucial-in-hurricane-porter.html

At a press conference in Geneva, the spokesperson for the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction called however many hundreds of deaths “totally unacceptable.”

“Why, six years after the Haitian earthquake, (are) adequate multi-hazard warning systems not in place to ensure minimal loss of life in events such as this?” Denis McClean said.

Particularly concerning: while the government wasn’t warned just before the 7.0-magnitude earthquake struck in 2010, it knew about the hurricane for five whole days before its 220-km/h winds sheared through the country’s southwest peninsula.

https://www.thestar.com/news/world/2016/10/14/the-positives-in-haitis-response-to-hurricane-porter.html

Concern for the economic losses due to damages caused by the hurricane in Haiti:

http://www.economist.com/news/americas/21708664-why-haiti-did-worse-cuba-protecting-its-people-misery-hurricane-matthew

Target announced donations that would assist people in the areas affected by Hurricane Matthew-Haiti Is included.
To support response and recovery in impacted areas of the Caribbean, including Haiti, Target will donate $75,000 to both Save the Children and UNICEF.

https://corporate.target.com/press/releases/2016/10/target-donates-400-000-to-communities-affected-by
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Re: Haiti now & the future

Postby CielOnTap on Tue Oct 18, 2016 9:38 pm

A Canadian running a program to assist kids whose parents cannot afford to care for them at home explained
how her program, UNICEF and one other organization left a meeting a few days after the hurricane because
talk was cheap but actual effort/coordination was not happening.
Her worry is that the survivors of the hurricane are about to get sick from three major illnesses as food, shelter
and sanitization are all short in quantities or delayed.
Canadian Morgan Wienberg spent the past two weeks in the centre of Haiti’s hurricane disaster zone, and she has a dire warning.

“Typhoid, cholera, famine — it hasn’t even started yet,” said Wienberg, 24, on Sunday. “People who didn’t die (in the storm) are going to start dying.”

https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2016/10/17/canadian-returns-from-haiti-with-warning-more-aid-needed.html

How the natural world provided shelter from the hurricane:
Officials in Beaumont say there are at least six caves they know of like this one, sheltering a total of 550 people living amid the moss-colored alps of the country’s southwest. It was not until leaders like Jean gradually made their way down to seek help that officials even realized the people were living in caves.

The first home to be rebuilt after the storm belonged to L’Anise Nazaire, who owns the lands where the cave is. If God saved the people with the cave, villagers say, then Nazaire was his messenger.

A slight 55-year-old, Nazaire risked her life to implore people to flee, delegating the task of saving her own mother to neighbours so that she could race up the mountain and warn others. She led them to the cave and the soaring cathedral of stalagmites at its base, where bands of light issue from an opening above. Many risked the steep descent to feel the sunlight during their stay.

https://www.thestar.com/news/world/2016/10/18/how-haitis-caves-saved-hundreds-from-matthews-fury.html
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Re: Haiti now & the future

Postby fishandchips on Wed Nov 16, 2016 10:21 pm

Couldn't let a piece on some environmental work that took a big hit in the Hurricane Matthew path go unshared.
One person lost his 25 years' worth of trees planted to help the land get forested. He did it on his own land
and knew there were companies wanting those trees.
Think this is the first time I've seen a news article discuss Haitian environmental works!

“This is destruction, pure destruction,” an emotional Pierre, 71, said standing atop a rocky cliff, surveying the desiccated limbs and exposed roots littering the ground. “When you have 25-year-old mahogany trees, it is not something that can be built back in a year.”

The now-toppled trees were supposed to help Pierre, a retired agriculture specialist at the Inter-American Development Bank, fulfil a vision to give back to his homeland. The part-time Aventura, Fla., resident and respected Haitian technocrat began nursing plants in Saincrit, located between the villages of Sassier and Duranton on the outskirts of Jeremie, as his way of saving Haiti.

Now, he joins the tens of thousands of farmers, homeowners, investors and other dreamers who fell victim to Matthew’s wrath. In this remote southwestern corner of Haiti, no one was spared.

https://www.thestar.com/news/world/2016/11/05/ericq-pierre-had-a-dream-to-reforest-haiti-then-hurricane-matthew-hit.html

With all the mess and infrastructure breakdowns after the hurricane, public health has to think of how to keep the survivors alive.
https://www.thestar.com/news/world/2016/11/09/haiti-vaccinating-800000-for-cholera-after-hurricane-matthew.html
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