The past revisited

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The past revisited

Postby southernfry on Tue Dec 04, 2012 5:33 pm

Around 10,000 Hungarians protested on Sunday against the far-right opposition Jobbik party, after one of its lawmakers triggered outrage and memories of Nazism by calling for lists of Jews to be drawn up.

The rally outside Budapest's parliament brought together leaders from governing and opposition parties in an unprecedented show of unity in the country's deeply divided political scene. "We cannot allow things which belong to the darkest pages of history books to repeat themselves," Antal Rogan, head of the ruling Fidesz party's parliamentary group, told demonstrators who waved national flags and demanded the resignation of Jobbik MP Marton Gyongyosi.


http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2012 ... e=obinsite


The past revisited In the worst way. There is no way to misunderstand his remarks, they are pretty clear that he meant to stir up a hornet's nest. Some have not learned from the past and keep wanting to revisit it and that is just not right.
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Re: The past revisited

Postby smitty on Thu Dec 06, 2012 2:55 pm

I was part owner of a m/c shop, so there in the morning to know all were ready to do their jobs. Having purchased my lst PC the firm said for so many dollars I could take a temporary course.

So each time it was on my m/c with proper riding gear, to helmet & such to lock up the bike at the back resident of this PC shop.

Would find my way in amongst four women that were learning & believe me I had a maze of learning to do even a bit.

Only one woman could answer a simple question. She told me the others looked upon me as a spy. No kidding in jeans, t-shirt with out shop name on it, to the helmet & gloves. They had assumed I was a spy, but for who for I was paying for this course, while there traning was by the Govt. Such a differnce that I quit & went back to work----to heck with the course.
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Re: The past revisited

Postby weights on Mon Feb 04, 2013 3:13 pm

DNA analysis supports the claim that a skeleton dug up from beneath a parking lot in the English city of Leicester represents the mortal remains of King Richard III, British experts declared on Monday.

"It's the academic conclusion of the University of Leicester that beyond reasonable doubt the individual exhumed at Greyfriars in September 2012 is indeed Richard III, the last Plantagenet king of England," Richard Buckley, the project's lead archaeologist, said during a news briefing in Leicester.


http://cosmiclog.nbcnews.com/_news/2013 ... d-iii?lite


History comes to life for some family members that may not have known that they have ties to British royalty. Curious to see what else they may find under that parking lot.

I think it would be fascinating if they used modern technology to reconstruct his face. See if what they think he looked like is accurate.
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Re: The past revisited

Postby smitty on Tue Feb 05, 2013 2:28 pm

Weights, now they are going to be forced to find who else was burried under the present parking lot.

My late parents & myself have said when we died away the cremation & really we did not care to have the remains.

Not that we were not good parents, I would say the best, but in the case of my Grandmother on my Father's side she was a bed ridden case till she died. The funeral even showed a spot for his ex-father, a sister, at a young age, to the wife & really him. So cremation seemed less in cost of all cases. Personally some container of my Mother or my father collecting dust is simple a waste of my time.

I admired my Father & my mother what with her knowledge of singing right to the last three days before she passed away. For from my Mother I took a liking to classical music, but from my late Father was jazz thanks to his outlook on music & just so much more like sand casting, working of a metal cutting lathe, drill press, several grinders, compressor, & Just so much more.

True they were die-hard tobacco smokers & that went into nagging headaches that often made it necessay that I could not attend my job at different jobs.

Neither obtain life insurance if they passed away & felt what was still left when they passed away would be okay for me. I have made a will out for a good friend of mine to where this is his estate & some $30,000.00 is his plus cremation of me as well. This estate meand being a home builder he can modify this one & sell it, to the guns along with the reloading presses are his plus the powder, primers & such.
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Re: The past revisited

Postby deja vu on Sun Apr 14, 2013 1:38 pm

From England to a tragic past revisited between Israel, Poland, and Germany. The story begins during the Holocaust and it's taken this long and a lot of luck for some families to learn not only what happened to their relatives, but where they are buried.

If it wasn't for the kindness of one man keeping track of those awful ID numbers and a town that cares for the dead the past would still be hidden.

http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013 ... stery?lite

Konstanty Dolnik, the local undertaker, buried the victims in the cemetery in defiance of German orders to bury them in a forest to erase their memories. Dolnik also recorded the numbers tattooed on their forearms.

In 1948, the town erected a monument with a cross to mark the mass grave. Only the numbers recorded by Dolnik identified the grave’s occupants. There were no names.


The residents of Swierklany mark this massacre with an annual remembrance service on Jan. 18, and also during religious holidays, most recently on Good Friday.

“The fact that the Jews are buried in a Roman Catholic cemetery helps us to recognize that we are brothers,” said Father Jan Klyczka, a priest in the village for the last 40 years, in a phone interview.

Local teenagers maintain the grave and learn about a massacre that’s hard for them to imagine, said their history teacher, Iwona Barchanska.
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Re: The past revisited

Postby ice cream on Thu May 02, 2013 10:06 am

Scientists revealed Wednesday they have found the first solid archaeological evidence that some of the earliest American colonists at Jamestown, Virginia, survived harsh conditions by turning to cannibalism.

For years, there have been tales of people in the first permanent English settlement in what is now the United States eating dogs, cats, rats, mice, snakes and shoe leather to stave off starvation. There were also written accounts of settlers eating their own dead, but archaeologists had been skeptical of those stories.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2013/0 ... YJxckpUKM0

Wow, her image looks like it could be any modern day teenager.

Amazing any of them survived the harsh conditions, as there was no way to prepare for what they found when they arrived. Only the strong survived, because desperation lead them to cannibalize.
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Re: The past revisited

Postby signs on Mon Feb 10, 2014 9:43 pm

There is a natural compulsion to wish that any historic battleground be consecrated as sacred, as a place to remember those who died in a fight over something that was worth dying for.

Alas, humanity’s insatiable appetite for war makes such automatic consecration untenable. In France, for example, so many layers of warfare lie atop one another that if every battlefield from over two thousand years were deemed sacred, there’d hardly be an acre left to put to any practical use.

Yet, many battlefields from the First World War in France have been saved for remembrance, most notably for Canadians at Vimy Ridge and Beaumont-Hamel (though the Newfoundlanders who fought and died at the latter were, at that time, not yet Canadians).

http://blogs.ottawacitizen.com/2014/02/ ... otographs/

A fantastic idea to remind some that while war is ugly, we can not forget the lessons of the past or present conflicts.

Other sites are just plain sad, such as Hawthorn Crater. It was blown out of the ground by British explosives on July 1, 1916, the opening day of the horrendously costly Battle of the Somme. (See footage of the explosion below.) A century later the crater is still “the size of two football fields,” Thériault says, and while nature has reclaimed much of it, with trees and shrubberies, humans have polluted it with spare tires and other trash. Some people are as indifferent to nature as they are to history.



This is beyond sad to see how little the locals care about their past and why the local government isn't doing more to clean up the site. We are the guardians of the past and of Mother Nature and it seems while some do a good job, others do not care.
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Re: The past revisited

Postby deja vu on Fri Aug 08, 2014 11:37 am

A horrible tragedy long forgotten except by the survivors and family members of the lost.

Jonestown, a tale of abuse, murder of the few sent to investigate, escalating to the mass murder of hundreds. Some willingly, others killed for wanting to escape his final act of murder. Now Jonestown is back in the spotlight with the terrible discovery of victims ashes, in a dilapated building.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/08/08/35 ... latestnews

Funeral directors say it is not uncommon for family members to never retrieve cremated remains. The Jonestown remains were found at the former Minus Funeral Home after the property's current owner, a bank, called, according to Dover police and public records. They also found 24 other containers of marked, identified remains, and five containers of remains they could not immediately identify, said Kimberly Chandler, spokeswoman for the Delaware Division of Forensic Science.

The dilapidated former funeral home in Dover had a padlock on the double front doors. The building showed few signs of its former use, although a floral design was etched in glass panes at the entrance. Dead vines hung from the building's white plaster walls, and cracked windows were repaired with blue tape.


Can the former owners be charged for leaving the bodies behind. No attempt to at leasts bury them instead of just walking away and locking the past away until now.
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Re: The past revisited

Postby signs on Wed Sep 17, 2014 2:07 pm

Scientists in Britain have given blow-by-blow details of King Richard III's death at the Battle of Bosworth more than 500 years ago and say two of many blows to his bare head could have killed him very swiftly.

Their analysis of the remains of the last English monarch to die in battle suggest he was attacked by one or more people, and that nine of 11 blows, clearly inflicted in battle, were to his skull and another possibly fatal blow was to his pelvis. The findings also support previous opinion that he had no helmet on. The head injuries are consistent with some near-contemporary accounts of the battle, the researchers said in findings published in The Lancet medical journal on Wednesday.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/king- ... -1.2768936

They found his living relatives and now the mystery surrounding his death has been solved. Or not, wonder if they will try to figure out if he was targeted by someone close to him, or just in battle as most think. Now perhaps the man can rest in peace.

Next historic mystery to be solved is?
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Re: The past revisited

Postby signs on Mon Oct 13, 2014 11:45 am

Archaeologists unearthing a huge ancient burial site at Amphipolis in northern Greece have uncovered a large floor mosaic.

The mosaic - 3m (10ft) wide and 4.5m (15ft) long - depicts a man with a laurel wreath driving a chariot drawn by horses and led by the god Hermes. The burial site is said to be the largest ever found in Greece. It dates from the late 4th Century BC, spurring speculation that it is linked to Alexander the Great of Macedon.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-29589427

To answer my own question - a beautiful mosaic that has been hidden for far too long. But, the mystery is not over until they figure out who it is linked to.

While they speculate I hope they find more hidden treasures within. Maybe it will tour one day once they are able to put the rest of the pieces in place to finish the puzzle.
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