Right to die cases

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Right to die cases

Postby deja vu on Thu Jan 16, 2014 4:38 pm

The Supreme Court of Canada has agreed to hear an appeal in a case that briefly overturned the country's ban on assisted suicide and offered a British Columbia woman a constitutional exemption to seek help in ending her life. The B.C. Civil Liberties Association, which has argued on behalf of several ill people who claimed they wanted to die with dignity, hailed the decision Thursday.

In 2012, Justice Lynn Smith of the B.C. Supreme Court ruled the existing law was unconstitutional, but delayed her ruling for a year to allow the federal government to rewrite the statute.

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/supreme-co ... -1.1642040

It's about time they make a decision on this subject. I still think the voters should have a referendum vote on this and let our voices be heard. It's a tough subject in any country and it's been in the spotlight a few times in the last few years.

I have seen the tapes from the people that are suffering and want this right and they make a compelling case for a yes on this. It's not going to go away and if the proper checks/balances are in place there is no reason someone shouldn't have the right to make the decision on their own.

I have heard from some saying that it would be open season on disabled kids/adults if the law was overturned, but I don't believe for a minute that it would happen. I believe that enough guidelines can be put in place to protect the vunerable from that. The people that have gone through with assisted suicide have been of sound mind, just listening to them speak as to why they want this and you can see they have given it great thought and do not take the decision lightly.

Too many say they can still live a full life despite severe restrictions have not been in their shoes. We can not begin to imagine what their quality of life is and should not act like we can. No one can except the person in that medical position and those caring for the person.

I think the Supreme Court needs to make the decision without any Government interference. What ever the outcome, one thing is sure, the subject will not go away. The side that loses will still keep on fighting.
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Re: Right to die cases

Postby flipflop on Thu Aug 21, 2014 4:02 pm

A B.C. woman experiencing the early stages of dementia has killed herself and left behind an open letter advocating for assisted suicide. Gillian Bennett, 83, said she didn't want to lose her "self" to dementia and leave behind an "empty husk" in a letter posted to her blog on Monday, shortly before she ended her life. "I will take my life today around noon," she wrote. "It is time. Dementia is taking its toll and I have nearly lost myself. I have nearly lost me."

Bennett was diagnosed with dementia three years ago. Her blog post says she opted to end her life now, before she lost her ability to act, because she could feel the disease quickly eroding her mind. "Ever so gradually at first, much faster now, I am turning into a vegetable," Bennett wrote.

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/b-c-woman- ... -1.1969778

This case won't be making its way into the courts, but it keeps the subject in the news and people talking. That is always good as it's a subject that is not going away anytime soon, and depending on what the Supreme Court does, it could force the hand of the government.

I have a feeling the majority would be in favor with a few checks and balances in place. Doctors are already changing their tune in favor, so the tide is changing. This brave lady did it her way, her time, before losing the final battle with dementia. She shouldn't have had to prepare this on her own that day, but with the way the law is right now her family could have been charged.
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Re: Right to die cases

Postby southernfry on Mon Sep 15, 2014 3:50 pm

A Belgian man serving a life sentence for rape and murder will be allowed to have doctors end his life, after a landmark ruling.

Unable to control his violent sexual urges, Frank Van Den Bleeken, who is 50, argued he would never be freed. The decision follows a three-year legal battle by the prisoner, who was convicted in the 1980s. The ruling is the first involving a prisoner since the assisted dying law was introduced in Belgium 12 years ago.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-29209459

Wow, didn't see this one coming at all, not surprised that Belgium is allowing this. At least this man has the courage to admit he will never be able to stop his rampages if let loose on society again. Don't see it happening in N. America anytime soon, doubt anyone in the prison system would ask for this.
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Re: Right to die cases

Postby deja vu on Thu Oct 09, 2014 12:34 pm

Brittany Maynard will not live to see if her advocacy makes a difference.

The 29-year-old woman expects to die next month. If the brain cancer from which she suffers does not kill her in October, she plans to take advantage of Oregon’s Death with Dignity Act and end her own life on the first of November — a few days after her husband’s 43rd birthday.

Her birthday is Nov. 19.

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/world/ ... story.html

It's so simple, just wanting to die with dignity, on your terms. As long as you are of sound mind, it should be one's right to end suffering. Oregon's law should be nation wide and Canadian polls show the subject is one that voters also support. I know some don't support the right to die and that is their choice, but do they have the right to force their views on the people that choose the right to die? It should be a personal/private matter, not one that has to be splashed across the headlines.

~~~~~

https://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/dailybr ... 28051.html

A new poll suggests more Canadians than ever support the right to physician-assisted death, but that the results are unlikely to move the political yardsticks. The Ipsos Public Affairs poll was conducted in August for Dying With Dignity, which supports decriminalization of assisted suicide and euthanasia. The survey of 2,515 people, more than double the sample for a normal national poll, found 84 per cent of respondents agreed with this statement:

“A doctor should be able to help someone end their life if the person is a competent adult who is terminally ill, suffering unbearably and repeatedly asks for assistance to die.” The poll results were released on the eve of a landmark case scheduled to be heard next week by the Supreme Court of Canada that holds the potential to overturn the two-decade-old Rodriguez decision upholding the existing criminal prohibition against assisted suicide.
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Re: Right to die cases

Postby burnt fare on Fri Oct 10, 2014 7:57 pm

Brain cancer is a tough medical row to have. Too bad there is no other therapies giving the woman something to try to see if the cancer will let her be. Really uneasy about right to die but recognize that some folks want their autonomy right to the end of their lives.
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Re: Right to die cases

Postby Surgeonsoul on Mon Nov 03, 2014 12:11 pm

An update on Brittany - Rest In Peace.

Weeks ago, Maynard had said she might use the lethal drugs Nov. 1, just a couple weeks short of her 30th birthday. Last week, she said she might delay the day. But she went ahead with her original plan. Crowley said Maynard "suffered increasingly frequent and longer seizures, severe head and neck pain, and stroke-like symptoms. As symptoms grew more severe, she chose to abbreviate the dying process by taking the aid-in-dying medication she had received months ago." Before dying, Maynard tried to live life as fully as she could. She and her husband, Dan Diaz, took a trip to the Grand Canyon last month — fulfilling a wish on Maynard's "bucket list."

http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/brittany-m ... -1.2821486

Janet Morana, executive director of the group Priests for Life, said in a statement after hearing of Maynard's death: "We are saddened by the fact that this young woman gave up hope, and now our concern is for other people with terminal illnesses who may contemplate following her example. Our prayer is that these people will find the courage to live every day to the fullest until God calls them home. Brittany's death was not a victory for a political cause. It was a tragedy, hastened by despair and aided by the culture of death invading our country."



I have heard a lot say mind your own business, we have no right to judge this young lady or force one's values on her. The arguement of gave up hope is bull, courage to suffer in angonizing full time pain isn't courage. She knew there was no hope left, just horrible pain and suffering for her and her loved ones and made her choice after going through all the information and what her body was saying. Also the live every day to the fullest is another bad arguement when every day is more pain and suffering and no quality of life. I also do not buy the hastened by despair and aided by the culture in this womens decision. She based it all on what was happening to her, the pain of each day and knowing it was going to become a lot worse. She was of sound mind and body when she made the decision and what was best for her and her family.

We keep hearing from these groups for Life, but one has to wonder if they would choose to suffer horrible pain, knowing it would only get worse and still be able to say that they would live life to the fullest when that means horrible pain and suffering. They have argued that there would be a run on deaths of disabled people, throw away people as some have called it, but that has never materialized. Until we are walking in the footsteps of patients like Brittany, we can not pass judgement on her in any way.

Every case that has made the news has shown men and women of sound mind, making a decision that was not taken lightly and involved the patient and the family in the final decision. If a case shows up involving deaths that others made the decision then that may be up to the courts to deal with, but society should not be involved in private matters and criticizing those that chose to take their own life then suffer with horrible pain from a medical condition.
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Re: Right to die cases

Postby deja vu on Fri Feb 06, 2015 11:56 am

Supreme Court of Canada overturns ban on doctor-assisted suicide

The Supreme Court paved the way for Canada to become the 10th jurisdiction in the world to allow some form of physician-assisted suicide this morning when it struck down this country’s blanket ban on the practice.

In a unanimous, 9-0 judgement, the Court determined a total ban on all forms of assisted suicide is unconstitutional, determining it should be allowed if specific circumstances are met. Those include that only a physician can assist in a suicide, the patient must be a competent adult who clearly consents to have their life end, and who has a "grievous and irremediable medical condition (including an illness, disease or disability) that causes enduring suffering that is intolerable to the individual in the circumstances of his or her condition."

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/ ... =d-tiles-1

It's about time and the Supreme Court has worded it to protect from any abuse so I think they have done their job. The state should not be able to make the decision for a competent adult and any who argue in court will have a hard sell to prove otherwise. Being an election year, I don't see Harper doing anything about it as that would risk the anger of his hard line conservative base. He will probably leave it up to the provinces to base their law on what the Supreme Court ruling states. Quebec should be changing their wording now because they limited assisted suicide to terminally ill and the top court has knocked that down.

The arguement of a sudden rash of killing vunerable never materilized in the last 20 years, so that arguement is gone, as it was nothing more than fear mongering. It is now and always should have been a personal/private matter between the person, their family and the doctor, no one else has the right to interfere just because they don't agree with assisted suicide. I have to wonder how many on the NO side would actually use assisted suicide if they were in that situation. It's easy to say NO on the outside, but when it suddenly impacts your life, do they stick to their guns, or make the choice to end their life?
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Re: Right to die cases

Postby Surgeonsoul on Fri Jun 17, 2016 6:22 pm

Fast forward and for now the issue has been settled and it is law. Changes may come, but they had to start somewhere and be mindful of missing the deadline that the Supreme Court imposed on them. It's not perfect, but now they have time to make changes while allowing Canadians the right to choose the outcome.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/assiste ... -1.3640195

The Liberal government's much debated and often criticized assisted dying bill is now law.

The bill received royal assent Friday afternoon after passing a final vote in the Senate earlier in the day. The bill was voted through after a final bid by senators failed to expand the scope of who qualifies for a doctor-assisted death.

Senator Peter Harder, the government's representative in the Senate, put forward the motion that the Senate should approve the amended bill and "accept the message passed by the House of Commons."
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