Hurricane Season

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Hurricane Season

Postby deja vu on Wed Sep 30, 2015 9:11 am

Right now Hurricane Joaquin has the US paying attention as it gets closer to their east coast. It's a catagory 1 and may grow in strength. The flooding has already begun and people need to heed the warnings from the officials. If they tell you to leave then do so. You can only do so much to protect your property before it hits, but once it does Mother Nature runs the show and sitting in your house to ride it out, does nothing but put you in danger. Property can be replaced, human life can not so please take necessary steps to your property and then get out of the way.


http://www.weather.com/storms/hurricane ... coast-2015

Hurricane Joaquin became the 2015 Atlantic season's third hurricane Wednesday morning and hurricane watches and warnings have been issued for the Bahamas while we nervously eye its potential to affect the U.S. East Coast.

An Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter reconnaissance aircraft measured sufficiently strong flight-level winds and low surface pressure to prompt the National Hurricane Center to upgrade Joaquin Wednesday morning. The Hurricane Hunters found a 55 mile wide eye open on its north side.



From Hurricane Catagories:

CATEGORY 1 HURRICANE:

A tropical storm with winds of 39-73 mph becomes a hurricane when it's winds near the center reach 74 mph. The storm surge is generally 4-5 feet above normal. Damage is mostly to trees and shrubbery, with no real building damage. Average wind speed for a cat. 1 is 74-95mph. Minimum central pressure (980 mb.)



CATEGORY 2 HURRICANE:

Winds are from 96- 110 mph. Storm surge is generally 6-8 feet above normal. Some roofing material, door and window damage to buildings. Considerable damage to trees and shrubbery with some trees blown down. Considerable damage to signs, mobile homes and poorly constructed piers. Coastal and low lying escape routes may flood 2-4 hours before the arrival of the hurricane's center. Minimum central pressure (80-965 mb.)



CATEGORY 3 HURRICANE:

This is considered to be a major hurricane. With winds from 111-130 mph. it can generate a storm surge of 9-12 feet above normal. Some structural damage to small residences with a minor amount of curtainwall failures. Damage to trees and shrubbery with leaves and foliage blown off and large trees blown down. Mobile homes and poorly constructed signs are destroyed. Escape routes cut by rising water 3-5 hours before the hurricane' center arrives. Smaller structures at the coast destroyed and larger structures damaged by floating debris. Terrain lower than 5 feet above mean sea level may flood inland 8 miles or more. Evacuation of low lying areas may be required. Minimum central pressure (964-945 mb.)



CATEGORY 4 HURRICANE:

With winds of 131-155 mph the storm surge runs 13-18 feet above normal. More extensive curtainwall failures with some complete roof structure failures on small residence. All shrubs, signs and trees blown down. COMPLETE DESTRUCTION of mobile homes. Extensive damage to doors and windows. Low lying escape routes maybe cut by rising water 3-5 hours before the arrival of the hurricane's center. Major damage to lower floors of structures near the coast. Terrain lower than 10 feet above mean sea level may be flooded as far inland as 6 miles. Minimum central pressure (944-920 mb)



CATEGORY 5 HURRICANE:

Winds greater than 155 mph. Storm surge generally runs greater than 18 feet above normal. Complete roof failure on many residential and industrial buildings. Some complete building failures with small utility buildings blown over or away. All shrubs, trees and signs blown down. COMPLETE DESTRUCTION of mobile homes. Extreme damage to doors and windows. Low-lying escape routes cut by rising water 3-5 hours before the arrival of the hurricane's center. Major damage to all lower floors of all structures located below 15 feet above sea level and within 500 yards of the shoreline. Massive evacuation of residential areas on low ground within 5-10 miles of the coastline maybe required. Minimum central pressure (920 mb or lower)
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Re: Hurricane Season

Postby rocks on Fri Oct 02, 2015 8:01 pm

Hurricane Joaquin, which was downgraded to a Category 3 storm Friday afternoon, has turned to the north and is expected to stay far of the East Coast as it moves northeast, forecasters say.

The storm has caused torrential rain and flooding on several islands in the central Bahamas. And forecasters say it isn't over. Central Florida beaches will see the affects of Joaquin on Saturday with dangerous waves and rip currents. Moderate beach erosion is possible with the afternoon high tides, combined with the increasing surf and wind.

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/weather/ ... story.html

Downgrading does NOT mean you let your guard down until it's gone for good, AND you still have to be careful during the cleanup, a lot of dangers can still be there so take precautions.

Safety first,, the officials will let you know when you should emerge from your safety area, they know best and have the most information, follow their instructions.
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Re: Hurricane Season

Postby trailblaze on Sat Oct 03, 2015 9:16 am

The fate of more than 30 crew aboard a cargo ship that ran afoul of Hurricane Joaquin off the Bahamas was unknown on Friday as the powerful storm battered the island chain for a second day.

News of the missing vessel came as forecasters shifted the likely track of the powerful storm further away from the U.S. East Coast, but there were still warnings about the potential for severe flooding in the Carolinas from unrelated heavy rains.


http://www.theweathernetwork.com/us/new ... mas/58061/

Why on earth did they not stay put until the storm has passed. Worse place to be is in the middle of the ocean, and it's not like they didn't know it was coming. It's not worth your life to keep a schedule when the waters are that dangerous. Sadly now 33 families may have lost a loved one, but who made the decision to continue, because if they were ordered to despite weather warnings, there could be a lawsuit involved. Your job is not worth your life.
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Re: Hurricane Season

Postby rocks on Sun Oct 04, 2015 11:30 am

More on that missing ship trailblaze posted about.

http://www.cnn.com/2015/10/03/us/el-far ... index.html


More than 48 hours since the U.S.-flagged El Faro was last heard from, the Coast Guard pressed its air search in the ferocious conditions of Hurricane Joaquin, with winds blowing 130 mph, for the massive vessel and its cargo of tightly stacked containers and 33 souls.


On Saturday night, the Coast Guard reported one piece of hopeful news.

An airplane involved in the search located a life ring from the El Faro about 75 miles northeast of the ship's last known position, the Coast Guard said in a press release. A Coast Guard MH-60 helicopter recovered the life ring and confirmed it belonged to the missing ship.

"It validates our search efforts and while we are disappointed we did not find the ship today we are hopeful," Coast Guard spokeswoman Marilyn Fajardo said. "Tomorrow, we will have three C-130s flying and the Navy will be assisting again with a P-8 aircraft."


We all pray they are found alive and well, but I'm not sure that finding that life ring is very helpful, but I am not an expert. I just feel that given the weather and how fast things can go way off course in this kind of storm, nothing is a given. Also the fact they had so many containers stacked, it would not take much for it to go down in that storm. Unfortunately, Mother Nature usually wins in these circumstances.
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Re: Hurricane Season

Postby CielOnTap on Tue Oct 06, 2015 11:33 am

A video is linked to the article in the New York Times in which anything the rescue team found was examined for survivors or
connection to the ship. Efforts were continuing to find the boat. The article covers some of the people who had family or friends
working on the missing ship.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/06/us/el-faro-missing-ship-hurricane-joaquin.html?smid=tw-share&_r=0
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Re: Hurricane Season

Postby testzone on Tue Oct 06, 2015 7:22 pm

The news so far is not good. The searchers have already found pieces of the ship and one body, so the only hope is that some may have survived by wearing a special suit to keep them afloat. The conditions were so bad at the height of the storm, it is hard to think that any have survived.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2015/10/06/el ... hurricane/

Nightly news is reporting one of two lifeboats have been found, some emergency suits and 2 large debris fields in water that is over 15,000 feet deep.
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Re: Hurricane Season

Postby CielOnTap on Mon Nov 02, 2015 4:20 pm

Indications exist pointing to the likely location of the El Faro, the cargo ship that was caught in hurricane weather on the open sea early last month
in the Caribbean.
http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2015/10/31/wreck-of-cargo-ship-el-faro-found-us-officials-say.html

A lawsuit was filed against the ship's captain by a sailor's family for his death on the ship. http://www.thestar.com/business/2015/10/14/captain-owner-of-sunken-ship-lost-in-hurricane-joaquin-sued-for-100m.html
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Re: Hurricane Season

Postby CielOnTap on Fri Mar 10, 2017 6:05 pm

In case you were considering a tropical cruise in the next few months and wondered when hurricanes are in season
(hence the inherent risk your cruise deal is offset by possible bad weather), here is a source that
explains the official seasons for hurricanes in both the Atlantic and the Pacific Oceans:


Officially, the Atlantic hurricane season starts June 1 and runs until Nov. 30. In the Eastern Pacific Ocean, hurricane season begins May 15 and ends Nov. 30, according to the National Weather Service. However, most of these storms hit during peak hurricane season between August and October, on both coasts, according to the National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center.

http://www.livescience.com/57671-hurricane-season.html

I recommend that you also look at your cruise ship's registry to see which country is considered the ship's home. That land's laws will apply onboard the ship while at sea. Do you know what laws apply?
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