How Things Move

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Re: How Things Move

Postby guitarblues on Mon Nov 09, 2009 10:42 pm

The ride's not really a ride; it's an art project. Noticed how worn and "original" the boardwalk to the wheel looks and the rust in the operator's camera. The different colored seats are unusual, as are the "fake" animals in the park around it. Strange idea...
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Re: How Things Move

Postby CielOnTap on Sun Nov 29, 2009 11:49 pm

Deicing equipment at airports-how do the operators know where to aim the ethylene glycol? Practice on plane wings before winter.

De-icemen cometh at Pearson Airport
After weeks of practice, airport's Snowball operators are ready to keep travellers safe. All they need is snow
Kenneth Kidd, Feature Writer
Published On Sat Nov 28

Domenic Colasante is sitting at the controls in his little glass-enclosed booth, cherry-picker-style, umpteen metres above the de-icing truck. It's a vantage point that curiously helps elicit two confessions.

The first is that he has, on occasion, succumbed to an obvious urge to use that giant nozzle at the end of the machine's extendable arm to, well, write something in glycol on the wing of a plane.

"Just when you're bored," he tells the scribe, who is clinging to a tiny steel balcony attached to the booth.http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/transportation/article/731990--de-icemen-cometh-at-pearson-airport

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Re: How Things Move

Postby alohasand on Mon Nov 30, 2009 2:42 pm

Curious that that a person afraid of heights has managed to last so long in the deicing business. Must be a good combination of equipment and pay that helped him stay on the job.
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Re: How Things Move

Postby alohasand on Fri Dec 11, 2009 3:04 pm

That phrase "once in a century" pops up in weather news again, now with an iceberg heading to Australia. The ice might want a taste of surf, wine, and barbecue, mate!

Australia shipping alert over massive iceberg
December 11, 2009 - 6:44PM
Australian authorities Friday issued a shipping alert over a gigantic iceberg that is gradually approaching the country's southwest coast.

The Bureau of Meteorology said the once-in-a-century cliff of ice, which dislodged from Antarctica about a decade ago before drifting north, was being monitored using satellites.

"Mariners are advised that at 1200 GMT on December 9, an iceberg approximately 1,700 kilometres (1,054 miles) south-southwest of the West Australian coast was observed," it said, giving the iceberg's coordinates.http://news.smh.com.au/breaking-news-world/australia-shipping-alert-over-massive-iceberg-20091211-kodq.html
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Re: How Things Move

Postby CielOnTap on Wed Dec 30, 2009 9:04 pm

If anyone smokes on China's newest high-speed train, the train won't move and everyone loses 2.5h of their day stuck at the station. You got warned!
Errant Chinese smoker stops world's fastest train
Wed Dec 30, 12:41 PM

BEIJING (Reuters Life!) - The world's fastest train hit its first speed bump in the form of a disobedient smoker less than a week after it began running in southern China.

A cigarette triggered an alarm that forced a two-and-a-half hour stoppage, nearly as long as the train takes to cover the 1,100 kilometer (684 mile) distance between Guangzhou, capital of Guangdong province, and the central city of Wuhan.

Managers of the bullet train, which debuted on Saturday, were unable to catch the smoker who fled the scene before the alarm sounded, the official Xinhua news agency reported on Wednesday.No-smoking train
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Re: How Things Move

Postby smitty on Wed Dec 30, 2009 9:18 pm

That jet aircraft was used a bit during WWII & those with Lancaster or Foying Fortress bomber machine gunners to Spitfires or Mustangs could not down one. I am pretty sure one is in England & perked up to its original form. If I am correct it really did not have any landing gear.

As for the woman with the burning car & driving it into the water. That was quite a chance on life but probably the best idea considering she made it out alive.
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Re: How Things Move

Postby CielOnTap on Sun Jan 03, 2010 10:29 am

Taking photos with a non-digital camera setup, one New York City man is making a living taking photos. His style of business harkens back to the early 1900s, when getting a photo cost money and it was a luxury for most people. He does not consider the digital camera operators with ink-jet printers generating image copies as competition.

A Camera and an Eye, Both One of a Kind

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RETRO Louis Mendes with his specially modified camera.

By DAVID GONZALEZ
Published: December 31, 2009
FORGET what your parents told you: money does grow on trees. Well, at least for the street photographers who work the crowds around the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree, it does. With digital cameras and ink-jet printers powered by car batteries, they churn out images at about $10 a pop.

Arrivistes, as far as Louis Mendes is concerned. Where is the skill in setting a camera to “automatic” and pushing a button? Where is the permanence in a shot printed with no-name ink on no-name paper? Where is the craft?

In his hands. Mr. Mendes works the same crowds — and parades, graduations and concerts — cradling like a piece of sculpture a vintage Speed Graphic camera outfitted with two flash units and a Polaroid back. Old-school photographer
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Re: How Things Move

Postby CielOnTap on Wed Feb 10, 2010 2:29 pm

Unfortunately, the helicopter pilot in the Sao Paulo, Brazil crash did not survive the landing. He did manage to keep the helicopter away from traffic and housing. There is a video that plays on the link. It shows the 360 degree rotations as the helicopter drops vertically. Sparking is visible from the tail end of the helicopter after it crashed.

It is a credit to the pilot that he managed to maneuver the helicopter as he did. The other occupant was seriously hurt.
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Re: How Things Move

Postby CielOnTap on Sat Feb 13, 2010 9:11 pm

Porsche Builds A Competition-Caliber Hybrid
By Tony Borroz February 11, 2010 | 4:35 pm
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Who said Porsche wasn’t going to make a high performance hybrid? There’s nothing higher performance than racing, and racing for 24 Hours on the Nordschleife of the Nurburgring is a special proving ground indeed. Porsche plans to run the ‘ring in a 911 GT3 R Hybrid that will have its world debut at the Geneva Motor Show in March.

Although Ferdinand Porsche developed the world’s first hybrid 110 years ago, the 911 GT3 R Hybrid will not be the first hybrid to race at the 24 Hours of the Nurburgring. That honor belongs to Gumpert, and we covered it here at Autopia

And although the Porsche is a hybrid, it is quite different in layout and design than the KERS system used last season in Formula 1 racing when KERS was awarded Powertrain Innovation Of The Year. The system in the Porsche was developed by Williams Hybrid Power using technology originally developed by the AT&T Williams F1 team. http://www.wired.com/autopia/2010/02/porsche-builds-a-competition-caliber-hybrid/

I found this item linked to the Toronto Autoshow's website. Today was Day 2 of the ten-day show. Zippy cars are the sizzle of automotive shows or track competitions.
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Re: How Things Move

Postby Speak-Ez on Sun Feb 14, 2010 5:34 am

CielOnTap wrote:Unfortunately, the helicopter pilot in the Sao Paulo, Brazil crash did not survive the landing. He did manage to keep the helicopter away from traffic and housing. There is a video that plays on the link. It shows the 360 degree rotations as the helicopter drops vertically. Sparking is visible from the tail end of the helicopter after it crashed.

It is a credit to the pilot that he managed to maneuver the helicopter as he did. The other occupant was seriously hurt.


To be honest, I do not think the pilot would have had a lot of control over where or how he put that helicopter down because that looks like a classic case of a tail rotor failure and unless you already have a fair amount of forward airspeed you are in serious trouble. I watched the video a number of times and I cannot ascertain how much forward airspeed the pilot had to work with before the loss of the tail rotor, but it seems not enough to keep from losing control.

And I am disappointed with the BBC reporter or announcer, or whatever his job is. He seems to think the pilot had some kind of control before the smoke from the engine could be seen which is nonsense and in that same sentence he uses the vocabulary "moments" and that's rather stupid. That accident scenario plays out within seconds, about 25 seconds, I think. If you don't have forward airspeed and altitude and you lose the tail rotor, that's what happens.

Anyway, I expect better from BBC.

Hope the passenger survives without serious lasting injury. Well, let's first hope he survives, right? It's been 4 or 5 days, right? He's still alive?

EDIT: Okay, I see now why some are referring to the pilot as a hero. I just found some other information and the pilot of the helicopter that filmed the crash had received communications from the other pilot of the stricken chopper that he was indeed having trouble with his tail rotor and it seems he purposely put the chopper down in that open area. Still, what we normally try to do is hit the gas, so to speak, and build up our forward airspeed and then find a nice long runway so we can do a running landing. We use the skids on the ground to keep the aircraft from spinning. The high forward airspeed is also meant to keep the chopper from spinning. That's the proper procedure for loss of a tail rotor. But you've got to get up that forward airspeed really fast. Well, you really do need existing forward airspeed to stand a chance. I guess Mr. Delgado Sobrinho, the pilot who lost his life, could not build up that forward airspeed he needed.

They'll find out what part broke to cause that tail rotor to fail. I didn't see a post accident fire that would cause an investigation a lot of trouble. Of course, they had to get a lot of police or city workers out there to police up a very large area. "Police up" in this context means to pick up any and all items they find on the ground under the area the helicopter flew, probably from about when Mr. Sobrinho first reported problems until impact. That is absolutely vital.

Can't find anything more about the cameraman's condition now.
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