Trick or Treat

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Re: Trick or Treat

Postby fishandchips on Wed Oct 29, 2008 11:46 am

Day of the Dead is one holiday to acknowledge ancestors but sugar skulls are new to me. The book mentioned in the article would be worth a read! We have all heard, read, or perhaps participated in the community helping out with meals after someone has passed away and the grieving family appreciates the gesture.

There are other cultures who set a place for ancestors or remember them through rituals at certain festivals or holidays but they may not be days specific to memorial days.

In China, people can buy paper money to burn for their ancestors (spring festival) when requesting their help in getting wishes met. Also, individuals leaving rice at their ancestors' graves will place the chopsticks in a vertical stance in the rice, which signifies the rice is for the deceased.

In Serbia, Christmas Eve can mean setting an extra plate at the table with Advent foods (no meat, dairy or egg dishes) for any departed spirits wishing to have a meal. The plate will have a bit of each food on it, along with some wine in a glass.
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Re: Trick or Treat

Postby CielOnTap on Thu Oct 30, 2008 2:39 pm

How about a costume showing a 404 Error on a computer screen? Find some reflective tape to place on a cardboard frame as a screen, then some plastic sheeting (like overhead projector sheets) to tape inside the frame.

Cut out letters (in blue or black paper) for a 404 Error message and tape them to the back side of the plastic sheet, so costumer can hold the "screen" in front of him/herself to display the error to households giving out treats. Person wears a head to toe white bodysuit or jumper to be the background to the message.

With all of the computers in use, most users will have found the 404 message on their screens during their online surfing.
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Re: Trick or Treat

Postby CielOnTap on Thu Oct 30, 2008 10:03 pm

Have a safe Halloween event/party, everyone! Remember to have reflective tape on costumes if going on the road for treat canvassing or use flashlights to light your walking path (please aim the lights at the road, not at drivers passing by).
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Re: Trick or Treat

Postby deja vu on Fri Oct 31, 2008 9:44 am

Ghosts-a-plenty at Castle Caldwell

Witches and warlocks, ghouls and ghosties - it is that time of year. But have you ever experienced
something that cannot be explained?

I have. It was after I had been to Castle Caldwell near Belleek, on a bat walk through the forest.

Bat-hunting was spooky enough, but later that night, when I put my recordings into the computer
for editing, it turned out I'd picked up more than the sound of bats flying overhead.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/northern_ireland/7701097.stm


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Re: Trick or Treat

Postby gossamer on Wed Oct 28, 2009 8:45 am

Yes, it's that time of year again. Would you spend Halloween at Leap Castle in Ireland? It was built in 800. Apparently it has a lot of ghosts including a nasty piece of work called an Elemental. It has a bad temper.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leap_Castle


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Re: Trick or Treat

Postby deja vu on Wed Oct 28, 2009 9:34 am

Gossamer: If you don't want a scary halloween, how about a really cold one?

~~~

GRISE FIORD, NUNAVUT–Ghosts and goblins can conjure their way across the polar ice pack to Canada's most northern community. Getting pumpkins, costumes and candy to the High Arctic for Halloween is Henny Richer's job. She does it with the deftness of a quartermaster on the march, moving costumes, decorations, food and toys thousands of kilometres to make sure this isolated hamlet can have the same celebrations most other Canadians take for granted.

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/arti ... he-pumpkin
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Re: Trick or Treat

Postby ice cream on Thu Oct 29, 2009 2:33 pm

Why we carve pumpkins, not turnips
Modern Halloween has roots in a Celtic holiday called Samhain


Big orange veggies are pretty strange as far as holiday symbols go, but there are actual historical reasons that we carve pumpkins every Halloween. Like Halloween itself, the display and carving of pumpkins — from the lanterns placed inside to the scary faces we pick — has pagan origins that morphed with the passage of time as well as the crossing of an ocean.

The modern traditions of Halloween have roots in a Celtic holiday called Samhain, which was celebrated throughout Western Europe (but especially Ireland) every Oct. 31 to mark the end of the summer and the final harvest.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/33532948/ns ... e-science/


Bring it to the west and like almost everything else it becomes one big commercialized mess. A dentist's dream with all the candy the kids and adults eat around this day.

At least one good thing is they switched to pumpkins. Justs looks better over all. Sorry, just can't get into a carved Turnip-O-Lantern.
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Re: Trick or Treat

Postby mousepad on Fri Oct 30, 2009 6:40 pm

From msnbc:

Spooky footsteps, faint figures, the feeling of being watched – these unsettling signs of a ghost are as familiar to us as the goose bumps on the back of our arm (or neck). But are there physiological explanations for those things that go bump in the night? Absolutely, says Joe Nickell, a senior research fellow for the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry, an organization that promotes scientific inquiry and critical investigation of paranormal and other extraordinary claims.

“I’ve investigated haunted houses, inns, theatres, graveyards, lighthouses, castles, old jails, and even office buildings,” says Nickell, who’s researched stories of ghosts, vampires, werewolves, sea monsters, psychic phenomenon and other unusual phenomenon for 40 years. “And I’ve never found a paranormal explanation.” Instead, Nickell says “ghosts” are often the result of pranks, environmental phenomenon, or physiological conditions such as sleep paralysis and the hallucinations that accompany it.

~~~~

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Re: Trick or Treat

Postby smitty on Fri Oct 30, 2009 9:06 pm

Something I do not do is answer the door when the kids, very few in our cases here, to had out some candies. I guess this is because I was the only child of my parents so the one time I was out I headed home toot-sweet as I was to frightened. True my Mother was with sweets only kids rarely knocked on the door.

I would say this is ALSO because they have a darn good community hall for the Trick & Treat time. That takes the toll off the parent from driving some of the kids from house to house & watching out for them.

In our past few yrs we have had to many boys or girls snatched from the parents home or the street & it could be death or you name it. Obviously parents REALLY do not like chancing their children.
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Re: Trick or Treat

Postby ice cream on Fri Oct 30, 2009 9:38 pm

Smitty:

The times they are a changing. Not safe for kids to go house to house any more. Stories of poison, razorblades, pins in candy are becoming all too common.

It's very scary that what was once a fun time for kid has turned into a danger. I think safe parties at school, home, community centers are the way to go now. At least then there is control over the situation and the kids can have fun.
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