Chocolate lovers cross to dark side

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Re: Chocolate lovers cross to dark side

Postby dreamon on Mon Dec 01, 2008 10:40 am

Chocolate-lover's paradises around the world
From Belgium to Hershey, Penn., 10 places to go cuckoo for cocoa

It’s just like any other addiction. You start slowly, gradually acquire a taste for the stuff and then ramp things up into a full-blown
habit. But you can’t help yourself—you love the subtle buzz, the lingering aftertaste, the euphoric feeling that seems to follow
every delicious encounter, to the point where you can no longer live without your daily dose. That’s when you know you’re a
full-blown chocoholic.

But who offers the best chocolate high? That depends on what sort of chocolate you crave and how far you’re willing to travel
for your buzz.

With more than a dozen factories and some 2,000 chocolate shops, Belgium is the undisputed kingpin of the chocolate world.
From nut-filled nougats and pralines to truffles and white chocolate seashells, the little European nation produces more than
170,000 tons of chocolate each year—an amount equivalent to the weight of 850 Boeing 747s.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/27667835/

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impossible things just happen and we call them miracles
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Re: Chocolate lovers cross to dark side

Postby verreettas on Fri Apr 10, 2009 9:39 pm

Harvard Professor Develops Inhalable Chocolate

It may be a hoax, a sly artistic commentary, a vanity project or simply the greatest thing ever known to man. A Harvard professor has come up with what he call "Le Whif" — inhalable chocolate with zero calories.

"Over the centuries we've been eating smaller and smaller quantities at shorter and shorter intervals," says Edwards on the product's official Web site. "It seemed to us that eating was tending toward breathing, so, with a mix of culinary art and aerosol science, we've helped move eating habits to their logical conclusion. We call it whiffing."


http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,514158,00.html


Enjoying a piece of chocolate or take a whiff of chocolate. I can see how he thinks this is a winner. :lol:
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Re: Chocolate lovers cross to dark side

Postby 123duyusee on Fri Apr 10, 2009 10:58 pm

Chocolate patches would be ideal. Aerosols have been said to be bad for the environment, so this "whiff" needs to be a spray or perfume strip.
The count is in...
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Re: Chocolate lovers cross to dark side

Postby CielOnTap on Wed Jul 15, 2009 12:40 pm

07/15/2009 A MINOR MIRACLE?
Swiss Company Promises Chocolate Revolution
By Alice Chalupny

Chocolate is just as much a part of Switzerland as the Alps. Now, global market leader Barry Callebaut has developed the product that competitors have been hopelessly puzzling over for 60 years -- chocolate that doesn't melt and is low in calories.

Serious mountain climbers know the problem all too well: Packing chocolate in your rucksack only ends in frustration when you reach the summit. If you're walking in freezing cold temperatures, the chocolate bar becomes a rock-hard block that's impossible to bite into without breaking your teeth. But, then again, if the sun is beating down, it won't take long before the chocolate melts into a gooey mess. In the worst-case scenario, you reach the mountain top, finally at your destination, and it's completely liquified.

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AP
A not-so-guilty pleasure? Reduced-calorie chocolate that doesn't melt in your hands is set to hit the shops in the next two years.
And even if the temperature is just right, there's still the problem of weight gain. As most of us have finally realized, chocolate is not one of the staple foods of the skinny minnie. http://www.spiegel.de/international/zeitgeist/0,1518,636365,00.html
80s pop music fan here!
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Re: Chocolate lovers cross to dark side

Postby ice cream on Mon Aug 03, 2009 9:51 pm

There seems to be a palette evolution with chocolate consumption and I’m proud to announce that I’ve graduated to the next step. First there was drugstore-quality milk chocolate in all of its Trick or Treat incarnations: individual kisses, snuggled against peanut butter, pressed against caramel and nougat or sprinkled with peanuts or almonds. Then there was introductory dark chocolate — heavy on the sugar and cocoa butter, light on actual cocoa content. After that I moved onto what I thought was the chocolate big leagues — dark chocolate made with 70 percent or more cocoa content. At this point chocolate was no longer a child’s distraction, it had developed into something serious — to be savored, appreciated and analyzed — not unlike a fine wine.

I was content to remain here, consciously sliding dark squares of elegant chocolate into my mouth whenever I needed to be transported to a complex, multi-layered taste experience. I quickly discovered that extra dark chocolate is not the binge chocolate of yesteryear.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/32271092/ns/today-green/

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I popped the strange object into my mouth and discovered that it was hard, crunchy and seriously bitter.



Pass. Not a fan of bitter chocolate. I think it would be a love it or hate it type of thing. No middle ground of tolerating it.
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Re: Chocolate lovers cross to dark side

Postby mousepad on Mon Sep 13, 2010 7:25 pm

Anyone looking for huge amounts of free chocolate should book a flight to Armenia's capital next month.

That's when the world's largest chocolate bar will be up for grabs in Yerevan's main square. The Guinness Book of World Records certified the 9,702-pound chocolate bar at a ceremony Saturday.


http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/39146861/ ... -foodwine/


That is just insane. Sure, board the plane, go through customs, cab it to Yerevan's main square and grab all the chocolate you can carry. Keep the cab meter running so you can high tail it back to the airport in time for your flight home. Will anyone do that? Probably someone that has a short flight and too much money to burn.
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Re: Chocolate lovers cross to dark side

Postby ice cream on Mon Aug 08, 2011 6:31 pm

Next time you board a plane, you might want to hand the pilot a chocolate bar, just in case. That’s because a recent study found that dark chocolate might improve your ability to see in low-contrast situations, such as poor weather.


http://bodyodd.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2011 ... esight-too


Still, moderation is the key. Over indulgence wont help your eyesight. At least there is another good
reason to eat chocolate.
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Re: Chocolate lovers cross to dark side

Postby smitty on Mon Aug 08, 2011 6:56 pm

Yes CielonTap in saying "-- Willy Wonka existence--" for I ALSO have a "sweet tooth" when chocolate is mentioned. I am trying to stay clear of it, but really not that easy in normal life.
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Re: Chocolate lovers cross to dark side

Postby ice cream on Fri Sep 13, 2013 7:03 pm

* Butter ratios at highest since 2008 in Asia, Europe, U.S.

* Global confectionary sales set to rise nearly 2 pct in 2013

* Chocolatiers scramble to stock up on butter

Chocoholics may have to dig deeper to pay for their favorite treat this festive season as sweet makers face sky-high prices for cocoa butter, the special ingredient that gives chocolate its melt-in-the-mouth texture. Increased demand from Asia's expanding middle class and a turnaround in sales in big consuming countries have seen butter prices nearly double to more than $7,000 a tonne from $4,000 a tonne six months ago.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/1 ... 18942.html

Say it isn't so! :roll:

Oh, well, we all know the chocoholics will pay the extra for the tasty treat. For the rest of us even a "once in a blue moon" chocolate bar will seem over the top.

Smythe
I am trying to stay clear of it, but really not that easy in normal life.


The majority do, but once in a while it's good for the soul. ;)
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Re: Chocolate lovers cross to dark side

Postby rodeorope on Sun Aug 17, 2014 3:13 pm

Listen up European Citizens who are chocoholics and more importantly a doctoral student. Cambridge University has a great job for you, a dream come true for chocoholics.

Is there a doctor of chocolate in the house?

Cambridge University in England is seeking a doctoral student to pursue what sounds like the sweetest job in the world: studying the fundamentals of chocolate.

The research goal, according to the job description, is to identify ways of keeping chocolate-based food from melting in warm climates. That's a challenge given that even the best-quality chocolate starts going soft around 34 degrees Celsius (93 Fahrenheit), below human body temperature.


http://www.ctvnews.ca/world/wanted-phd- ... -1.1963331

More on the job listing:

http://www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/4702/

An industrial, fully-funded 3.5 year PhD studentship is available to study the fundamentals of heat-stable chocolate , based in the Department of Chemical Engineering & Biotechnology, co-supervised by Prof. Malcolm Bolton (Geotechnical Engineering), Prof. Eugene Terentjev (Soft Matter Physics) and Dr Ian Wilson (Chemical Engineering). Due to funding regulations, the studentship is only available to EU nationals.

The project will investigate the factors which allow chocolate, which has a melting point close to that of the human body, to remain solid and retain qualities sought by consumers when it is stored and sold in warm climates. The project sponsor has existing technology in this field and the project will develop a fundamental understanding of the area which extends beyond the industrial need. The project is mainly experimental and will employ rheological and analytical methods from a range of engineering and physical science disciplines. Theoretical aspects will require good mathematical skills. The supervisors have extensive experience in studying soft solids, including foods.
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