Terminology/jargon & what they mean

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CielOnTap
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Re: Terminology/jargon & what they mean

Post by CielOnTap » Thu Oct 01, 2009 6:39 pm

If you want to be in show business, there are terms to learn to be fluent in "film and TV speak" before your name gets a credit on a production.

http://www.variety.com/index.asp?layout ... =slanguage
80s pop music fan here!

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Re: Terminology/jargon & what they mean

Post by CielOnTap » Mon Nov 16, 2009 9:31 pm

'Unfriend' is New Oxford American word of the year
Mon Nov 16, 5:10 PM

WASHINGTON (AFP) - The New Oxford American Dictionary named "unfriend" -- as in deleting someone as a friend on a social network such as Facebook -- its word of the year on Monday.

Oxford University Press USA, in a blog post, said "unfriend," a verb, had bested netbook, sexting, paywall, birther and death panel for the honor.

"Unfriend has real lex-appeal," said Christine Lindberg, senior lexicographer for Oxford?s US dictionary program.Word of the Year
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CielOnTap
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Re: Terminology/jargon & what they mean

Post by CielOnTap » Tue Nov 17, 2009 8:51 pm

An opinion piece that tidily sums up frustration with service in its various formats, especially when one decides to need it in a rush or last-minute purchase. Take notice of the many familiar forms of "no" that appear in the article.

November 16, 2009, 9:30 pm
Stanley Fish
Can I Put You On Hold?
There is a class of utterances that, when encountered, produces irritation, distress and, in some cases, the desire to kill. You hear or read one of these and your heart sinks. Everyone will have his or her (non)favorites. Mine is a three-word announcement on the TV screen, “To Be Continued,” which says, “I know that you have become invested in this story and are eager to find out how it ends, but you’re going to have to wait for a few days or a week or a month or forever.” In the great order of things, it is only a minor inconvenience, but it is experienced as a deprivation; you were banking on something and now it has been taken away.

In the same category are “Sold Out,” when you’ve been been waiting in line at a movie theater for 30 minutes (I know you can get tickets online, but sometimes you’ve decided to go out on the spur of the moment); “Closed for Private Party,” when you’ve been looking forward to a meal at your favorite restaurant all day; “Back in an Hour,” when you’ve come crosstown to buy something you need to have immediately; “Not in Service,” when you’ve been counting on using an A.T.M. or getting a Coke; “Use Other Door,” when you’ve gone around a long block to get to what you thought was the main entrance; “Register Closed,” when you’ve been waiting not-so-patiently behind a fellow customer with 25 items; and “The role of Violetta will be sung by the understudy,” when you’ve spent hundreds of dollars to see Renée Fleming. Can I Put You on Hold?
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CielOnTap
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Re: Terminology/jargon & what they mean

Post by CielOnTap » Fri Nov 20, 2009 1:37 pm

http://www.dutchnews.nl/contact/adod.php If snappy Dutch phrases and acronyms have you at a loss, there's a book that will tell you what they mean. Interesting cover, but I cannot make out the words in the speech bubble.
Image
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Re: Terminology/jargon & what they mean

Post by CielOnTap » Tue Dec 08, 2009 9:02 pm

It's so chilly today, that I was bivering(rhymes with "shivering") as I took this shot! (According to the Dictionary of Newfoundland English, it means "to shake with the cold (especially of the teeth)".
http://www.theweathernetwork.com/your_w ... /2/upload/ To see the image accompanying that unusual verb, click on the link.

First time I have heard of "bivering."
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Re: Terminology/jargon & what they mean

Post by fishandchips » Sun Dec 13, 2009 11:23 am

Reading online this morning and discovering new meanings for words that have better known definitions:

Cramming-(phone bill fees that seem unwarranted)
Obviously, that sort of skullduggery is blatantly against the law, but such fraudulent charges are tacked on to phone bills so often there’s a name for it: “cramming.”
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/13/your- ... er.html?em

Breakage-(gift card money bonanza for merchants; I thought it was the term for broken merchandise that cannot be sold and perhaps related disposal costs)
But a big problem remains, and it’s awfully hard to legislate away. This year, nearly $5 billion of the money that well-meaning givers have put onto gift cards will go unspent, according to TowerGroup, a financial services consulting firm. The money then reverts back mostly to the retailers and banks that loaded the plastic initially.

In the industry, this is known as breakage, and here’s what it means: If you buy a gift card for a family member or friend, there’s a good chance you’ll give a little gift to the retailer or bank that issued it as well.
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/12/your- ... ey.html?em

Look at the kind of money breakage can reap (those are HUGE balances to be banking, what with the lousy interest rates for much smaller account balances). Couldn't Home Depot fix bridges?
This is how some of the people in the industry talk about gift cards when they think consumers aren’t listening. And for big companies, breakage can add up to real money. Not every big retailer or bank discloses it, but Best Buy was kind enough to note that it kept $38 million in breakage in its most recent fiscal year. Home Depot cleared $37 million. Breakage can be total when a retailer goes out of business.
Frozen? Not I. Love hot drinks and ice rinks.

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Re: Terminology/jargon & what they mean

Post by CielOnTap » Wed Dec 30, 2009 12:19 am

USC offers America 101 for foreign students
A special 12-week class helps students from overseas adjust to life and lingo in L.A.
By Larry Gordon
December 29, 2009


The topic was baseball and the class members, foreign graduate students recently arrived in the United States to attend USC, were befuddled.

Not only were they struggling to follow the instructor's litany of batting and pitching rules, they were mystified by the title of the hallowed championship games. Why is it called the World Series, one Chinese student wondered aloud, if all the teams in it are from North America?

Instructor Edward Roth was both taken aback and pleased. The grandiose title might reflect America's arrogance about its national pastime, he acknowledged, but he also praised the question. It reflected the type of cross-cultural debate he encourages in a course aimed at helping these newcomers from overseas adjust to life in Los Angeles.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me ... 2861.story

The head honcho discussion in the article was amusing. Teacher and students both showed awareness of the others' leader.

I will try to find out what the course costs; no success in the continuing education guide.

The culture orientation class is a very good idea-as the students progress in their studies, they become aware of expressions used by peers and have questions in this class for the instructor.
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Re: Terminology/jargon & what they mean

Post by alohasand » Wed Dec 30, 2009 4:59 pm

epic fail-something with no success or perceived to have no success

lawyered up-with the celebrity stories of the past few weeks, the term shows up in articles referring to individuals who have retained lawyers for legal matters (pending divorce, domestic situation, scandal, etc.)
Staycation=stay at home and do fun things inexpensively.

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Re: Terminology/jargon & what they mean

Post by CielOnTap » Tue Feb 23, 2010 8:04 pm

global standards; best practices-the prevailing and most current services offered in a particular industry. Pity that when these terms are inserted in publications (such as studies!), examples of some typical services, regarded as the most up-to-date and in which industry, are scarcely provided. Another irritant about the use of the terms-seldom mentioned is/are the organization(s) or individual(s) who initiated the standards/practices that are more modern than the previous practices.

The terms appear to be used as "fillers," words that fill blank spaces quite nicely and seem to convey knowledge without actually sharing any.

Another jump-the-shark moment in jargon posting. Please revert to your preferred distraction.
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Re: Terminology/jargon & what they mean

Post by manga2read » Tue Feb 23, 2010 11:16 pm

:D Leave the sharks alone, CielOnTap. They did not opt in for the phrase. Besides how does one communicate that to sharks except by jumping? Churn rate on jargon is high.
a word with you

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