Workplace decoder

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Workplace decoder

Postby CielOnTap on Sun Mar 28, 2010 6:01 pm

People, policies, politics, place--all factors in what is known as one's workplace. Of course, not everyone will act the same--there will be various people wanting status at work or accommodation for their causes/needs/woes.

Though this article is a few days old, it will help you spot the persona in your workplace that can throw obstacles to work that requires all staff to contribute to the workplace's daily functions and goals. If the company cannot make payroll, everyone is likely to be wondering about their employment prospects, so be conscious of the staff makeup.



Work
How to survive a toxic workplace
Caustic colleagues will make you sick – if you let them. A new book explains how to cope with poisonous co-workers
Wency Leung

From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Published on Monday, Mar. 22, 2010 4:01PM EDT
Last updated on Wednesday, Mar. 24, 2010 9:16AM EDT


Are you doing more than your fair share at work, but getting little thanks? Are you grossed out by your co-worker’s disgusting habits? Do you dread going into the office each day? If so, you’re likely in a toxic workplace.

In her latest book, Surviving the Toxic Workplace, U.S. author and psychotherapist Linnda Durré breaks down dozens of common toxic personalities, from The Brownnoser to The Non-PC Joke Teller, and offers solutions for treating these so-called “Staff Infections.”

Like with a dysfunctional family, she says, individuals have the power to change the dynamics of a dysfunctional workplace by altering their own approach to dealing with difficult and annoying people.

You suggest people should tackle a toxic situation themselves before reporting it to the boss or to HR. Why?

When you go to the boss too many times, you get the reputation of being a whiner and a complainer, and I really want to prevent that from happening [to people] because if you do that too much, you’re going to lose credibility and you’re going to lose influence. And when something is really, really important, they’re not going to pay any attention to you.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/work/how-to-survive-a-toxic-workplace/article1508373/
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Re: Workplace decoder

Postby CielOnTap on Sat Apr 17, 2010 9:35 pm

How Facebook ruined my career
Painful social-networking gaffes, with corporate consequences.
By Christopher Steiner and Helen Coster

With 400 million registered users, Facebook is a great place to find a job. For more than a few cavalier souls, it's a great place to lose one, too.

By now you'd think folks would know what to let fly on Facebook and what to keep to themselves. Not so.

"Common sense is a good guide here, but people can be so taken by the novelty of these sites that they forget there are consequences to posting the wrong thing," says Kerry Ryan, a litigation attorney with Tarlow, Breed, Hart & Rogers in Boston. Ryan specializes in disputes between companies and former employees--and he's seeing more and more bad situations kindled by poor judgment online. http://technology.canoe.ca/Forbes/2010/04/15/13596101-forbes.html

How many people know if their workplace has written rules on social networking and the posting of work matters online? What about unwritten rules, especially if they come down from the bosses and supervisors?

For the staffers who are hired for their social-networking skill set, do they have to sign an agreement as to what they can do online in their personal time? Their skills could get stale if not put to use daily. A fine line between workplace confidentiality, personal boundaries and employment law.
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Re: Workplace decoder

Postby pretzels on Sun Apr 18, 2010 9:04 pm

"How Facebook ruined my career" comes across as a title for talk show segment. Probably will be on someone's show if enough names to draw audiences to the tube come along into the Facebook & truth quicksand about life at work.
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Re: Workplace decoder

Postby CielOnTap on Sun Jul 11, 2010 10:54 am

Job lessons from World Cup
Published: Sunday | July 11, 2010

American sports journalist Howard Cosell once noted that sports is human life in microcosm.

If this is true - and I believe it is - then some of life's greatest lessons must be found in what many call 'the greatest show on Earth', the FIFA 2010 Football World Cup.

In watching and enjoying the world's best exponents of 'the beautiful game', however, it is easy to be swept along in the euphoric tide of World Cup frenzy and miss the many essential lessons that can empower our personal, business and career success.

Here are three from South Africa.

IT'S ALL ABOUT GOALS

'Goals win matches' is a football cliché. It's also true of life.http://jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20100711/news/news5.html

Are your goals written down? If not, they are mere whimsical wishes.

Become a S.M.A.R.T. goal setter — be specific, measureable, attainable, realistic and time-bound. Goals give power to vision.
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Re: Workplace decoder

Postby CielOnTap on Mon Aug 23, 2010 6:21 pm

Cross-cultural gift giving at work
By Pamela Eyring, REUTERS
Last Updated: August 23, 2010 7:37am
LONDON - As a protocol expert, I receive queries almost daily from busy executives seeking to navigate international business relationships. The good news is that the majority of executives are aware of the need to consider cultural differences when forging international relationships. They understand that everything from the use of titles and seating charts to handshakes and follow-up correspondence needs to be approached with consideration as to how it will be perceived through the cultural lens of their business contact.

However, there is one aspect of relationship building that tends to get overlooked, sometimes with significant consequence. That is the art of international gift-giving.

Most often exchanged at the close of important meetings and during visits to different facilities or sites, gifts serve many purposes in business. They are used to build and maintain relationships, to show respect and appreciation, or to enhance the image or reputation of a company. http://www.edmontonsun.com/life/2010/08/23/15109951.html


I'm not found of Christmas gift exchanges in the workplace as the activity is another drain on resources that could have been used for something more useful. It is different with friends, as there is an investment in the social relationships.

The corporate gift giver faces a budget, uniqueness goal, cultural and business mores and possible interest from the tax agency. There would be a need to know who to ask about customs releases for certain objects. And the average person feels overwhelmed with a regular gift list...
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Re: Workplace decoder

Postby CielOnTap on Sat Sep 11, 2010 2:48 pm

Radio stations could play Twisted Sister's We Not Going To Take It for the Norwegian broadcaster who had enough of her workplace pressure. She quit during a live broadcast.

Norwegian newsreader quits in live radio broadcast
Sat Sep 11, 11:14 AM
By The Associated Press

OSLO - A Norwegian radio journalist quit on the air after complaining about her job and saying she wouldn't read the day's news because "nothing important has happened" anyway.

Pia Beathe Pedersen accused her employers at the regional radio station of public broadcaster NRK of putting too much pressure on the staff. No news
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Re: Workplace decoder

Postby CielOnTap on Thu Dec 16, 2010 10:33 pm

The Swiss bank, UBS. Better known in our News topics section, UBS has released a new workplace dress code for its employees. I'm sure that the authors of the code know how widely available (or not) skin-tone lingerie is for men and women. Skin tone aka nude shades comprise a small segment of the white and off-white garments that predominate in the underwear stores and departments. The men must be thinking "where do I get skin-toned underwear?"
UBS tells employees to stick to 'skin-coloured' lingerie
Agence France-Presse – Wed, 15 Dec 11:33 AM EST
Swiss banking giant UBS has issued a strict dresscode for employees, calling on them to wear "skin-coloured" lingerie and to ditch "fancy and coloured" artificial fingernails.

In a document of over 40 pages, UBS underlined details from head to toe, including permissible hairstyles, what cut of skirt and which type of socks to wear.

Women should not wear "flashy" jewellery or skirts that are "too tight behind."

Underwear must not be "visible against clothing or spilling out of clothing." Rather, they should be "skin-coloured under white shirts." http://ca.news.yahoo.com/ubs-tells-employees-stick-skin-coloured-lingerie-20101215-083304-861.html

Being a thorough code, examples of what flashy mean or too tight behind are provide in a legend or footnote for staff to visualize or understand the specific nature of the dress issue, aren't they?
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Re: Workplace decoder

Postby CielOnTap on Sat Feb 26, 2011 6:10 pm

Women lawyers leaving in droves
Published On Fri Feb 25 2011
Trish Crawford
Living Reporter
She spends her days serving sweet-potato fries and baked beans, but Melissa Fox-Revett used to charge by the hour to find corporate tax breaks. The decision to turn her back on a lucrative Bay St. tax law practice to open a Roncesvalles restaurant wasn’t an easy one to make. But the long hours of a busy office and the three children in her life were incompatible, she says. “You can make great money. In my experience what often happens on Bay St. is that problems are resolved with money. “That’s not what I signed up for. I was coming in at 7 a.m. so I could leave at 6 p.m. and see my family. I didn’t go to the gym, didn’t go for lunch or pal around with other lawyers. And I’d still get ‘the look’ when I left.”

The 47-year-old owner of Blue Plate loves her customers, but says she considers having left law after nine years of practice, “a tragedy.” “A part of me will always wonder what might have been. I do feel like I lost something. It does hurt me.”

The exodus of women lawyers from Ontario firms has so alarmed the Law Society of Upper Canada that it has instituted a raft of programs to staunch the flow (see sidebar). Why are they leaving and where do they go, these high-achieving, super-bright women who fought to get into law school and spent thousands of dollars in tuition, only to walk away from the prestigious Bay St. firms when they became mothers? http://www.thestar.com/living/article/944937--women-lawyers-leaving-in-droves

Tuition and work experiences plus books and ancillary fees--law students spend money for that education. How many of the female lawyers have their school debts retired prior to making a career switch?

What’s being done?

After its 2008 study “Retention of Women in Private Practice” documented the flight of women from law, the Law Society of Upper Canada instituted a number of initiatives.

It created a three-year pilot program, the Judicia Project, aimed directly at retaining women, with 56 of the province’s largest law firms participating. Flexible schedules, family-friendly practices and mentoring programs are being created.

But the society also turned its attention to smaller firms and sole practitioners by creating a $3,000-a-month maternity allowance (for three months) for lawyers who don’t qualify for Employment Insurance. In the first year, 27 men and 75 women used this fund.

It has also built a roster of contract lawyers who will handle a practice while someone is away. The scheme looked to medicine, which uses visiting doctors, or locums, to fill positions, as a model.

Contract lawyers sound like good people to fill-in for terms when the regular lawyers have to step aside for medical, family or other reasons.
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Re: Workplace decoder

Postby CielOnTap on Wed Mar 02, 2011 6:32 pm

8 work-at-home pitfalls
March 02, 2011
By Alison Griffiths

I work at home and almost everyone I know who doesn’t, envies me. Sure, there are workplace benefits galore: short commute, no wardrobe issues, few distractions, no time clock and last, but most definitely not least, no boss on site.

But as a public service to all you work-at-home wannabes, here is a list of pitfalls.

1.The if-you’re-at-home-you-can’t-be-working effect. This can range from unwanted drop ins during prime work hours to family calling for lengthy chin wags. Once I had a friend appear with her two toddlers. She told me she’d lost her babysitter and needed emergency help to keep an appointment.

2. No water cooler! It can get lonely, without co-workers for time-wasting chats. You might find yourself gaily conversing with delivery people and offering them coffee just to keep them hanging around.

3. No work, no pay. Sure you can take a break or vacation any time you want, but when you’re not working you don’t get paid. Most self employed people I know rarely take holidays. And sick days? Forget about it!

4. The office is always open. Even on a Sunday morning an unfinished job seems to find you and push the guilt button. And those you work for know you’re there, so they don’t hesitate to call outside normal office hours.
http://www.moneyville.ca/blog/post/947034--8-work-at-home-pitfalls
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Re: Workplace decoder

Postby smitty on Wed Mar 02, 2011 10:06 pm

CielOnTap, when you mentioned your downfall due to facebook, THEN for sure I am glad that I did not fall to their requests of me to join. The addie probably came from fellow gun shooters at our Club, but I guess is me simply not answering them the light has come on that this strange character will not join. Though they do not know the reasons WHY.
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