Workplace decoder

Work / Education

Re: Workplace decoder

Postby alohasand on Sun Apr 03, 2011 4:38 pm

This could have been posted under Global Cost of Living or even English teachers/instructors abroad but it really is about workplace issues in the New York City school system for teachers from other countries.
http://jamaica-gleaner.com/gleaner/20110403/lead/lead4.html
In a meeting last Monday at City Hall, Brooklyn, led by Judith Hall, chairman of the AIE, the teachers made seven demands, including discontinuance of principal letters; teacher reinstatement and restoration; adjustment of work-classification status; financial assistance for legal fees; and an overhauling of the International Support Unit.


Just what does the International Support Unit offer for teachers from other countries?

The ISU does not seem to be visible on the Department of Education site but the jargon sure is.
http://www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert/topics_az.html
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Re: Workplace decoder

Postby CielOnTap on Tue May 03, 2011 10:43 pm

The article is about the downsides of working retail for low pay, with corporate decisions directing how much staff can do or not, and customers who don't think of the humanity of sales staff. Rather than leaving the book topic in Books-pageturners or doorstoppers, the subject seems to convey the reality of mall life as a worker that deals with customers.

As jobs are still hard to obtain, let alone ones that provide a decent living, this item seems made for workplace decoding. Read on:
Actual headline in the paper was "Servitude with a smile."
Putting up with the ‘random vitriol’ of shoppers for $11 an hour

Zosia Bielski
Globe and Mail Update
Published Tuesday, May. 03, 2011 6:26AM EDT
Last updated Tuesday, May. 03, 2011 10:56AM EDT
At the age of 50, Caitlin Kelly got a job in retail.

Fired from The New York Daily News, the journalist and author decided to supplement her freelance writing income with a stint at The North Face in wealthy Westchester, N.Y.

Ms. Kelly describes her two-year stint selling sleeping bags and ski gloves to hedge-fund managers and society matrons in Malled: My Unintentional Career in Retail.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-investor/personal-finance/putting-up-with-the-random-vitriol-of-shoppers-for-11-an-hour/article2008000/page1/
The result of such conditions are high turnover rates across the industry, according to Ms. Kelly. Even so, she describes an esprit de corps among her fellow associates, who included former executives and a veteran of the French Foreign Legion.
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Re: Workplace decoder

Postby CielOnTap on Tue Aug 30, 2011 11:01 pm

Is driving a car to work at a university adding some stress or long hours to your day? A Canadian university professor decided that he was not going to tolerate a lack of parking spaces that would necessitate his arriving a half-day early in order to get a parking spot for his afternoon class. He had done that routine for some years. So he resigned.

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/article/1047101--halifax-professor-quits-over-lack-of-parking?bn=1

A couple of potential strikes are looming in Ontario:
GO Transit--a major system of buses and trains that carries people into Toronto and the surrounding urban areas-- has its workers' union filing for a strike.
http://www.thestar.com/news/transportation/article/1047146--strike-deadline-looms-for-go-transit-workers?bn=1
College support staff--Sept. 1 is when possible strike action can occur. The strike won't close colleges but will definitely impact service delivery to students.
http://www.citytv.com/toronto/citynews/news/local/article/151408--talks-stall-as-strike-deadline-looms-for-college-support-staff
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Re: Workplace decoder

Postby CielOnTap on Wed Oct 19, 2011 11:11 pm

It was tossup between the Workplace Decoder thread or the Jargon thread--"crowdsourcing" merits mention for its computer age application of driving freelance computer work costs down---how low? Read on.
Crowdsourcing links piecework with freelancers competing to work for pennies
Published On Tue Oct 18 2011
By John Terauds
Staff Reporter
Business Reporter
The emergence of cloud computing is about to change the way we work as much as how we live and consume infotainment.

As pitched to governments, business and consumers, the cloud removes software and storage from individual users’ machines and assembles them in massive remote servers around the world.

But it also allows office workers to work from home computers on assembly-line tasks in competition with thousands of others.

This is casual labour reduced to its most basic form, as individuals from Calcutta to Calgary face off in a virtual jobs game where low cost and speed trump education or experience.

“The whole industry is in very early days,” says trailblazing Australian entrepreneur Matt Barrie, founder of Freelancer.com. “We are on the verge of transforming society and how we run business.”
http://www.thestar.com/business/article/1071491--crowdsourcing-links-piecework-with-freelancers-competing-to-work-for-pennies

Question: which country's employment laws would apply to this Internet method of finding the lowest cost freelancing? Then there would be questions about what makes a civil society that provides social services...
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Re: Workplace decoder

Postby Speak-Ez on Wed Oct 19, 2011 11:41 pm

.

What happens if you can't access your stored information?

"... the cloud removes software and storage from individual users’ machines and assembles them in massive remote servers around the world."


I am sure there are many possible reasons why you could lose access to your stored information, but the one that jumps out at me that could affect every "massive server" is one monster solar flare. No doubt about it, a monster solar flare will wreck havoc with communication systems on the side of the planet facing the sun. Maybe more surface area.

Yes, I know it would seem that somebody at NASA has written that on the surface of Earth there is not as much chance of trouble with computers as in space, but there seems to be a kind of disclaimer that a fair bit of information on this is classified. So what/who are we to trust?

http://solarb.msfc.nasa.gov/for_educators/flarefaq.html

Another thing is that more and more Net connections are relying on satellites, like the super satellite that was launched a few hours ago by Viasat -- I think called Viasat1, or something. That's a monster satellite and there are more to follow. Great, you rely on your connection to your information through that satellite and the good Sun decides to put on a light show that disconnects you from your data because that wonderful satellite just became space garbage.

Nope, I want my stuff stored right next to me at my work station. And I want that backed up by other devices that have my stuff stored all safe and sound right in my home. Maybe an outside storage place would be good safety, but only as long as I also have to right here at home. I'll not let cloud anything store my stuff without it also being stored by me.

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Re: Workplace decoder

Postby CielOnTap on Thu Feb 02, 2012 9:46 am

McMaster University students hear business speakers discuss their experiences and dispense advice about the business world. A two-day event, aimed primarily at commerce students but open to other students willing to follow the dress code and preregistration, is an annual one.

Colin McNeil 1 hour 10 minutes ago
'Be authentic; be transparent'
McMaster students soak up entrepreneurs' advice


Get real and get green.

Between jargony biz phrases like “social capital,” “green washing,” and “scaling mount sustainability,” the message Wednesday at the 33rd annual McMaster World Congress was go green and go social.

The two-day event is a business conference organized by the DeGroote School of Business where 16 industry leaders and successful entrepreneurs take the podium at Mac’s student centre.

Historically, the conference has been a commerce-students-only event, but in the last few years, the congress has opened its doors. This year, anyone can attend free of charge. That’s if there were any spaces left. This is the first year pre-registration has filled up, and organizers are expecting more than 4,000 people — still mostly students — to attend over the two-day period.
http://www.thespec.com/news/business/article/664580--be-authentic-be-transparent
“You will fail,” Mountain told students. “I guarantee at some point in your careers, you will fail. Don’t just delete that failure off your Facebook page,” she said. “Be authentic, be transparent.”

You have to be able to say “we screwed up — but here’s how we’re going to fix it.”

“She’s talking about our demographic,” said an enthusiastic Borgorin. “There’s no (commerce) class on Facebook — it’s almost too new.”
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Re: Workplace decoder

Postby pretzels on Mon May 21, 2012 8:20 pm

About time that open office companies finally get the message that loud colleagues are not worth the teeth gnashing during work hours. The exposed beams and loft space thing are not concepts I like for work unless it is a quiet space and quiet on the other side of the walls, floor and ceiling/roof.

From Cubicles, Cry for Quiet Pierces Office Buzz
By JOHN TIERNEY
Published: May 19, 2012

The walls have come tumbling down in offices everywhere, but the cubicle dwellers keep putting up new ones. They barricade themselves behind file cabinets. They fortify their partitions with towers of books and papers. Or they follow an “evolving law of technology etiquette,” as articulated by Raj Udeshi at the open office he shares with fellow software entrepreneurs in downtown Manhattan.

“Headphones are the new wall,” he said, pointing to the covered ears of his neighbors.

Cubicle culture is already something of a punch line — how many ways can we find to annoy one another all day? — but lately the complaints are being heard by the right people, including managers and social scientists. Companies are redesigning offices, piping in special background noise to improve the acoustics and bringing in engineers to solve volume issues. “Sound masking” has become a buzz phrase.

Scientists, for their part, are measuring the unhappiness and the lower productivity of distracted workers. After surveying 65,000 people over the past decade in North America, Europe, Africa and Australia, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, report that more than half of office workers are dissatisfied with the level of “speech privacy,” making it the leading complaint in offices everywhere.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/20/science/when-buzz-at-your-cubicle-is-too-loud-for-work.html?src=me&ref=general

Here's a new term-pink-noise system:
it installed what is known as a pink-noise system: a soft whooshing emitted over loudspeakers that sounds like a ventilation system but is specially formulated to match the frequencies of human voices.


Basic courtesy sent down the company ranks would help--keep voices low, others are working, take the conversations to designated seating areas/rooms. But that means effort on everyone's part. Lunchtime must be fun too with noises and sounds and who is supposed to keep the computer/cubicle tidy.
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Re: Workplace decoder

Postby smitty on Wed May 23, 2012 12:39 pm

CielOnTap, this has been an interesting Thread to following Posts. So when one thinks of it, if YOU had a problem you only had to ask the Foreman & never to the Head Man.

On Sunday we had a married couple join the indoor h/gun section with a lovely made Walther semi-auto suiting her small hands & with something I had never knowen of being even smaller then a normal .22 LR round.

The husband made sure she understood how to handle it, & the same to me for it was a bit different.

Really this was when Mary came in around 1:00pm though she tends to be a bit late & was so this same day. So I filled in.

I made sure that no one touched a gun for this woman & I moved down to 12 yds from target to give he a better idea of what she was doing at that shorter distance. Seemed okay to me though not extremely tight groups.

She insisted on moving back to the tables at 25 yds, & from then on she had trouble putting all rounds on the paper, of the target.

She told me she tended to close BOTH EYES. At 1st I assumed it was the left eye, but no it was when shooting.

Mary arrived & in a while she solved the problem. True this woman kept the gun in the proper form of both hands to also the bbl did not move down when shooting.

She was wearing similiar costly ear protectors as me (do remember I shoot anything from .22, 38Spl, 9mm to my love for my 45ACP) that is loud even with lighter loads for indoors. Mary felt this young woman was closing her eyes when shooting----meaning the sound.

So additional soft ear plug that the Trap shooters use, only, & that was the answer including her ear muffs meaning doing a better job of cutting down the noise.

I have always pointed out to others, in the Club, when reloading to keep the loads light with powder. Take 38Spl where I use 4.3 grains of CIL powder & so many were up to 5.8 grains which is loud.

True my 45ACP is loud for it is a much larger bullet tip though where others use 5.5 grains of so many powders I use 4.3 grains of another powder for they group just as tight. To go below the 4.3 grains would have some scattered groupings. Though admit with a different powder with a 45ACP larger in diameter & heavier bullet tip I use this rare powder of 4.2 grains. THOUGH if I cannot obtain this Winchester 452AA, Winchester strop producing in 1980, I will have to go to another brand & possibly up to 5.0 to 5.1 grains.

Yes I forked out a lot of money for an even better set of ear muffs that are battery operated so at times I can turn up the power/volume so I can hear others speak. Still so often the batteries fail & within two weeks it is another $15.00 for another two batteries AGAIN, so went to the best normal muffs.
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