Interpreter certification group decides to fold

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deja vu
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Interpreter certification group decides to fold

Post by deja vu » Sun Nov 09, 2008 10:18 am

The Japan Interpreters' Association, a private company that teaches and certifies conference
interpreters, has shut down and canceled several examinations nationwide because it was unable
to get financial aid.

In a Web site posting dated Tuesday, the company said it "has been forced to close down as it
could not receive necessary financial assistance amid the latest economic recession" and has been
forced to stop offering tests to certify conference interpreters and good-will interpreters who can
speak Japanese, English and Chinese.

http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/ ... 109a1.html

So what now? Hopefully they will get their money back. BUT the govt should step in and run the
exam. Clearly there is a need for it. OR will they sit back until its too late and when they need the
people to fill the jobs there wont be enough to meet the demand?
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Re: Interpreter certification group decides to fold

Post by CielOnTap » Sun Nov 09, 2008 11:49 am

Interpretation for various sectors (conferences, court system, business) do require some form of certification. From the article, my impression that conference interpretation was a private business because the company saw a demand for it. I will attempt to find out what official interpreter association(s) exist in Japan. There is likely a general organization that interpreters and translators all have to belong to.

As for refunds from the closed company, I guess the students will have to apply for consumer law redress to recover any of their fees.
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Re: Interpreter certification group decides to fold

Post by CielOnTap » Tue Nov 18, 2008 11:15 pm

I discovered that there is an organization just for conference interpreters. A 2002 interview with an individual with European language experience, as well as experience working in the Asian market, reveals how conference interpreters plan and work for their assignments.

LISA Profiles: “Are You Talking to Me?”
Interview with Jean-Pierre Allain, International Association of Conference Interpreters (AIIC)

LISA Profiles

In our latest profile of notable industry figures Minako O'Hagan asked Jean-Pierre Allain, President of the International Association of Conference Interpreters (AIIC), about interpreting, the role of technology in interpretation, and the changes he has seen in his 30-year career as a conference interpreter, as well as his vision of the future of interpretation.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
LISA: How did you get into the interpreting profession and what are your languages?

Jean-Pierre Allain: I was born into a multilingual and multicultural environment. My father was French, my mother is British and I was born in Paraguay. I went to school first in German, then English and finally Spanish in which I did most of my secondary education. My family then moved to Brazil where I finished high school in Portuguese and went on to study Neolatin Languages and Literature at the University of Sao Paulo. At that point I decided I wanted to do something practical with the 5 languages I already spoke fluently (English, Spanish, French, German, Portuguese) and I wanted to contribute to international understanding. So I went to Geneva, Switzerland, to study translation and interpretation. There I became interested in economics and also took a degree in that subject. While living in Geneva I went to Italy several times and learnt Italian. I then met my future wife, who is Dutch, and, although we mostly speak English and French together, I learnt Dutch from her family on frequent visits. So I now work with the five languages mentioned plus Dutch and Italian.

LISA: Could you describe your typical working week?

Jean-Pierre Allain: In one week I might be interpreting for a conference on accounting in Hong Kong, then return to Bangkok for a few days before going off to a conference on urbanism in China. The next assignment might be a conference on psychiatry in Japan or on tourism in Korea. Assignments vary from one day to 7 or 8 days, but have become shorter over the years. When I worked in Geneva, where I lived for 12 years, I used to get 5 to 8 weeks assignments with the UN. These are now non-existent.
http://www.lisa.org/globalizationinside ... lking.html
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CielOnTap
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Re: Interpreter certification group decides to fold

Post by CielOnTap » Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:51 pm

http://jat.org/ Japanese Association of Translators seems to be one Internet group of translators and interpreters in Japan, as well as outside of Japan. I couldn't locate a professional organization that is considered the one that Japanese interpreters or translators would have to be members of in order to get the professional jobs.

Most countries have professional entities for professional interpreters or translators but be aware in some countries (ie. Canada), professional bodies are regional (by province) and are not national, so there could be limitations as to who can call themselves a professional and be legally registered as one. In Canada, the issue has to do with education being a provincial responsibility, not a federal responsibility. That is why credentials outside of a province have to be verified, and translated if needed, and compared to the destination province's curriculum for the field of study to determine if a person can carry on in the field and become registered or needs to do courses to be brought up to field requirements in order to become registered.
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