French Politics

Re: French Politics

Postby rocks on Thu Dec 15, 2011 2:41 pm

A French court has given former President Jacques Chirac a two-year suspended prison sentence for diverting public funds and abusing public trust. Mr Chirac, 79, was not in court to hear the verdict because of ill-health but denied wrongdoing. President from 1995 to 2007, he was put on trial on charges that dated back to his time as mayor of Paris.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-16194089


He should be paying back the funds or at least some of what he diverted. Tough call on jail time with his health issues. It would cost a fortune to house him in some jails medical ward. Probably close to the amount he illegally diverted.
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Re: French Politics

Postby CielOnTap on Sun Dec 18, 2011 6:00 pm

As a former head of state, Chirac's costs could be higher due to any privileges he may still have as a former leader (security, benefits including health services/insurance). If he had been an ordinary citizen, he would discover what allotment of medical care funding is provided to ordinary people in the jail system.

In other people news, how many of us even knew the name of the French Prime Minister? He does have a working relationship with the Deputy PM, Nick Clegg, in the UK and they speak to each other in French. Recently, the French finance minister, Francois Baroin, made comments about the UK's credit rating and the French PM and the Deputy PM had a chat about those comments-they were not well-received in the UK.
But late on Friday afternoon, the French Prime Minister Francois Fillon telephoned Nick Clegg out of the blue to "clarify" his earlier comments on the UK economy, where he had suggested that the UK should lose its AAA credit rating before France did.

Clegg told Fillon that "recent remarks from members of the French government about the UK economy were simply unacceptable” and that steps should be taken “to calm the rhetoric".

Speaking to Huffpost UK a spokesman for Nick Clegg said: "The deputy prime minister and PM Fillon have quite an extensive working relationship and have had several long meetings this year. They conduct their business in French. On this particular occasion since the remarks that have been made, PM Fillon wanted to get in touch.
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Re: French Politics

Postby CielOnTap on Sun Jan 29, 2012 11:47 pm

A development in the French elections--somehow there are seats for French ex-pats in the National Assembly to represent 11 extraterrestrial zones beyond France's borders. Canada's not amused and said so. Note to France--I'm sure the people of the French islands St. Pierre and Miquelon as well as actual French territories want candidates to say "bonjour" in person.

Canada to France: keep your election to yourself
Peter Kuitenbrouwer, National Post · Jan. 27, 2012 | Last Updated: Jan. 27, 2012 3:13 AM ET

Julien Balkany, an investment banker who lives in New York, arrives in Vancouver Tuesday as part of a campaign swing that has taken him, in recent days, to San Diego, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle. Mr. Balkany, who is a citizen of France, wants to win votes in French elections set for June.

For the first time, about two million French citizens who live outside France will elect 11 legislators to the French National Assembly, an exercise for which France has carved the world into 11 electoral districts. One seat up for grabs is "North America," which includes Canada and the United States, home to about 200,000 French nationals. Mr. Balkany, 30, is one of seven candidates for that seat. His main competitor is Corinne Narassiguin, another New York banker, who is running for the Socialist Party; Ms. Narassiguin will campaign in Montreal on Monday.
http://www.nationalpost.com/todays-paper/Canada+France+keep+your+election+yourself/6059321/story.html

Last fall, the Foreign Affairs department sent around Circular Note No. XDC-1264 to heads of diplomatic missions in Canada, on "both the conduct of foreign electoral related activities in Canada and foreign electoral constituencies."

"The department continues to encourage foreign states to allow citizens residing permanently or temporarily in Canada to exercise their right to vote in their country of origin's elections or referenda, namely via absentee ballot," the circular states. But then it adds, "It must be emphasized that, as a matter of policy, the Government of Canada will continue to refuse requests by foreign states to include Canada in their respective extraterritorial electoral constituencies. Also, the department will not allow foreign governments to conduct election campaigns in Canada or establish foreign political parties and movements in Canada."

(Ottawa enacted the policy in 2008, after Italy in 2007 held a parliamentary election in which expat Italians elected 18 parliamentarians to represent them. The representative for one riding, which stretches from Panama to Alaska, lives in Toronto.)


Apparently, other nations have tried the same tactic. Had we known that for the last federal election, I'm sure it would have changed some campaigns due to discussions.
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Re: French Politics

Postby alohasand on Mon Jan 30, 2012 3:10 pm

Is this another strategy to keep France in the news? I mean the country had those summits and then the discussions about that former IMF leader when his story was THE story on both sides of the Atlantic.

Will Canadian media continue to follow that candidate's travels through the country? Just for curiousity's sake. Hope someone in the E.U. wises up to this beyond borders-reach. Sounds like a bully at work.
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Re: French Politics

Postby CielOnTap on Sat May 05, 2012 11:44 am

I was watching the last few minutes of RDI's Weekend morning program and I did not see mention of a live broadcast of the French election results--though I had seen an ad to that effect last week. The host was talking about Victoriaville, Quebec where students and police and some politicians were in scuffles there yesterday. A camera had a live feed of the Victoriaville council chamber (not that any meeting was occurring but there was someone off-camera whose arm got into frame then quickly moved out of frame.

President Sarkozy's main challenger in the second round of voting is Francois Hollande.

Oh, it seems the voting is tomorrow. I did see a mention of campaigning having to stop 48h before election day, which was midnight, so I'm one day ahead of myself. There are no results on Le Figaro's website yet.
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Re: French Politics

Postby smitty on Sat May 05, 2012 12:46 pm

I know the French President was nothing like the Italian one that had a number of women for his pleasure, but the French President did like women.

Mind you the matter of him with his exercisses & his doctor that saved him. NOT GOOD one has to admit. For it keeps on comming up in the Cdn TV News that we need to have more & more exercises.

More so to someone like myself in being 80+ years of age.

Then you have to wonder what European country will be helping Greece & a few others out of trouble matters when it comes to money & their debts.
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Re: French Politics

Postby fishandchips on Sat May 05, 2012 2:32 pm

Greece will be having an election of its own soon, as so many people are unhappy about the loans from the IMF that caused the present Greek leader to cut, cut, cut in the government. Problem is, one person who would run likely won't help any party if his party wins the election-he's not a coalition supporter. Greek politics will be charting new terrain with the economy living on cuts and borrowed money.

How's the swimming pool tax collection proceeding in Greece? Have all owners made good on their taxes owing>
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Re: French Politics

Postby CielOnTap on Sun May 06, 2012 8:04 pm

Hollande is the French President-Elect, having received 52% of the votes in the second round of voting.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-17975660

Mr. Sarkozy exits France's main political stage and will have time to determine his next direction. We've seen Sarkozy get along famously with German Chancellor Merkel at international meetings, so now we'll wait to see how Merkel greets the new president-elect.
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Re: French Politics

Postby smitty on Mon May 07, 2012 10:33 am

Hi ice cream when you supplied us with "--protesters urging the government to do more to protect jobs and wages.--. Then I can see it is the same thing wanted in many countries being Cival Servant jobs with the Government. For the same is demaned & wanted in Canada to some other countries.

Some might be boring jobs, but easy on the employees & they do not find themselves in normal hard working jobs or jobs that require a good education.

Now "protecting their jobs & wages" is a tricky question for many countries are running into deep debts.
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Re: French Politics

Postby no1home on Mon May 07, 2012 2:44 pm

Out with the old leader and in with the new. Apparently the new one will do a 360 from Sarkozys way of doing things, but this new one has zero international experience. That will hurt him a little unless he has some really good people around him.

But in the end, the more things change the more they stay the same. Sometime in the future the new kid on the block will do something to upset the voters and he will be voted out.
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