Berlin Still Divided on How to Commemorate Wall

Berlin Still Divided on How to Commemorate Wall

Postby CielOnTap on Fri Mar 06, 2009 10:55 pm

03/06/2009
HEATED HISTORY
Berlin Still Divided on How to Commemorate Wall

By Jess Smee

It has been nearly 20 years since Berliners hacked away at the Wall that once separated East Germany from the West. Two decades on, its crumbling remnants remain highly controversial. Many would like to see Berlin make more of its unique history, but old wounds are taking time to heal.

Bernauer Strasse used to be just another unassuming residential street -- that is until the Berlin Wall catapulted it to international fame overnight. The street, which was built into the city's Cold-War-era divide, saw east Berliners flee to the West by clambering out of upper-story windows towards the crowds on the street below.

The historic images were beamed around the world and the road which lined the east-west border became an icon of the human tragedy behind the Berlin Wall. Today, despite its less than central location, Bernauer Strasse, is the site of the capital's memorial to the Wall, attracting a steady stream of visitors. http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/0,1518,611790,00.html

The teardown of the Berlin Wall is approaching its twentieth anniversary in 2009.

This year will be significant for another event too: the protest at Tiananmen Square will also be twenty years old (another reason for China to be concerned, as many unemployed citizens are viewed as potential social activists).
80s pop music fan here!
User avatar
CielOnTap
Moderation Team Leader
 
Posts: 10135
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2008 3:39 pm
Location: Canada

Re: Berlin Still Divided on How to Commemorate Wall

Postby pretzels on Fri Mar 06, 2009 11:21 pm

The psychological impact of the wall echoes through the generations living before and during the Wall's construction. At least visitors trying to look for remnants of the wall have some physical evidence of it and that is all they need for proof.
Old salt on board.
User avatar
pretzels
Senior Member
Senior Member
 
Posts: 487
Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2009 3:38 pm

Re: Berlin Still Divided on How to Commemorate Wall

Postby CielOnTap on Sat Apr 18, 2009 3:46 pm

http://www.spiegel.de/fotostrecke/fotostrecke-41629.html#backToArticle=619651 Photo Gallery link

IMAGES OF A LOST WORLD
East Germany, Up Close and Personal
By Karlheinz Jardner

When a West German photographer set off on a trip to the East German island of Rügen just after the Wall fell in the spring of 1990, he captured a world that would soon disappear forever. Twenty years after the epochal event, he looks back on his journey in a first-person account.

I remembered the painting from art class in school: The Chalk Cliffs on Rügen, by Caspar David Friedrich. It seemed legendary to me. On the one hand, I was fascinated by the colors, the pinks, the grays, the greens, and the shimmering blue of the water contrasting with the luminous white chalkstone. On the other hand, I was convinced that although I could always see the painting, I would never be able to contemplate the same scenery in reality. I wondered whether the landscape on the island of Rügen truly resembled the painting. It was a mystery to me.

And then the Berlin Wall came down. It was the spring of 1990, and I was 36 and living in the West Germany city of Essen. I was visiting a friend in Berlin when it all happened, and I decided to take advantage of the opportunity. It must have been May when I traveled to Rügen. I had grown up in the Ruhr region and all I knew about the other half of Germany -- other than Friedrich's painting of the chalk cliffs -- were the images of East Germany I had seen on television. One was of the Palace of the Republic, an image that led me to conclude that the German mentality over there was no different than it was where I lived. In other words, everything was very orderly and tidy. Other than that, I had seen a small slice of East Germany several times while traveling on the transit route between the Marienborn border crossing and West Berlin. I wasn't exactly tempted to see more. http://www.spiegel.de/international/zeitgeist/0,1518,619651,00.html

I often enjoy reading other people's travel essays or visits to places that had not been seen in years. It is always fascinating to notice what the writer takes note of and perhaps even why that note is taken.
80s pop music fan here!
User avatar
CielOnTap
Moderation Team Leader
 
Posts: 10135
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2008 3:39 pm
Location: Canada

Re: Berlin Still Divided on How to Commemorate Wall

Postby Rhet-or-Ric on Sat Apr 18, 2009 4:14 pm

.
I've got an idea on how to commemorate the tearing down of the Wall -- put it back up.

.
The Eyes Have It.
User avatar
Rhet-or-Ric
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 5845
Joined: Mon Mar 31, 2008 5:05 pm

Re: Berlin Still Divided on How to Commemorate Wall

Postby fishandchips on Sat Apr 18, 2009 6:19 pm

Mind that you have to click your way back here through the 45 photos but do check out the images. The Cliff Hotel was the top hotel of its time for political party members. The suite is something else.

The little girl's doll pram looks somewhat like what I had when I was just a bit older than that girl!
Frozen? Not I. Love hot drinks and ice rinks.
User avatar
fishandchips
Super Member
Super Member
 
Posts: 1378
Joined: Wed Sep 10, 2008 2:06 pm

Re: Berlin Still Divided on How to Commemorate Wall

Postby fishandchips on Sat Apr 18, 2009 7:31 pm

Rhet-or-Ric, any wall building would have to be temporary--a scale model out of Lego bricks? Who would want to sponsor such a task?

Have to see if anyone is selling "commemorative bricks" online in honour of the anniversary. Unless the bricks were reused from the Wall to build other buildings to accommodate the "new" citizens that went to West Germany.
Frozen? Not I. Love hot drinks and ice rinks.
User avatar
fishandchips
Super Member
Super Member
 
Posts: 1378
Joined: Wed Sep 10, 2008 2:06 pm

Re: Berlin Still Divided on How to Commemorate Wall

Postby pysanky on Thu Apr 23, 2009 3:07 pm

Have a museum exhibit, with images of the wall on film screen, for few months. Not enough decades have passed for older people to talk about the time of the wall and the politics involved. Too recent.

Could consider compiling stories for future book to be printed in 10 years' time to reassure contributors of passage of time. Hard to tell personal stories now without leaving some names and details out.
Happy New Year-2015 now on scene.
User avatar
pysanky
Senior Member
Senior Member
 
Posts: 390
Joined: Sat Feb 07, 2009 7:13 pm
Location: International food court

Re: Berlin Still Divided on How to Commemorate Wall

Postby CielOnTap on Fri May 29, 2009 12:51 pm

A photograph stash was found by two men after their father's death. Given the number of images found, that photo exhibit seems like a future endeavour.

05/29/2009 PHOTOGRAPHIC TREASURE TROVE
What East Germany Was Really Like
By Solveig Grothe

They wanted to clean up the basement but found a treasure trove of photos instead. After Berlin teacher Manfred Beier died, his sons stumbled across 60,000 pictures. Their father, it turns out, created one of the best documentations of life in East Germany, and the first days of the West.

It's amazing how little you can know about your own father: After the death of Berlin resident Manfred Beier in 2002, his sons Wolf and Nils began to sort out their inheritance and came across a treasure. They found dozens of wooden boxes stacked on shelves as well as numerous chests of drawers -- similar to pharmacist cabinets and apparently custom-made. The drawers contained removable inserts, each of which had staggered rows of small drilled holes about three centimeters in diameter. Each of these holes held a roll of miniature film.

The brothers knew their father had taken a good deal of photographs throughout his life. But this? They could only estimate the number of pictures that their father had left behind: some 60,000, plus a series of home movies -- a seemingly unmanageable collection. In his basement, though, they found 38 notebooks that served as the keys to the collection. The orderly, handwritten notes -- on roughly 4,000 sheets of paper -- helped the brothers keep an overview of all the film rolls as they rummaged through the basement. Manfred Beier had made a chronological list of every photo, complete with an archival numbering system. The notes detailed exactly how each picture came to be -- the day, hour, and minute it was taken; the camera, aperture, and shutter speed used to take it; and the exact location of its subject. http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/0,1518,627720,00.html
80s pop music fan here!
User avatar
CielOnTap
Moderation Team Leader
 
Posts: 10135
Joined: Tue Aug 19, 2008 3:39 pm
Location: Canada

Re: Berlin Still Divided on How to Commemorate Wall

Postby 123duyusee on Fri May 29, 2009 1:17 pm

The photos will catch the eye of any car or bus fans of historical vehicles. There is even an airplane parked in front of a museum and photos of school trips and activities.

I don't know how the photographer's parents liked having a flash go off during a meal.
The count is in...
User avatar
123duyusee
Junior Member
Junior Member
 
Posts: 228
Joined: Sat Feb 07, 2009 10:30 pm
Location: The Castle

Re: Berlin Still Divided on How to Commemorate Wall

Postby alohasand on Fri May 29, 2009 2:09 pm

Image

There must be a story of how this chairlift came into existence over a roadway! :roll:
Staycation=stay at home and do fun things inexpensively.
User avatar
alohasand
Super Member
Super Member
 
Posts: 636
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2009 8:37 am
Location: Kokomo

Next

Return to Politics

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 8 guests