Chinese Political Scene

Chinese Political Scene

Postby mousepad on Tue May 19, 2009 6:34 pm

China has reportedly freed the last activist still jailed for "hooliganism" relating to the Tiananmen Square democracy movement of 1989. Liu Zhihua was freed in January, but news of his release has only now been confirmed, according to the Dui Hua Foundation, a US-based pressure group.

Mr Liu had been jailed for life for leading a strike at a factory. His reported release comes two weeks before the 20th anniversary of the Tiananmen protests.

The events on June 1989 are still considered a highly sensitive topic by China's Communist authorities, and the anniversary is unlikely to be publicly marked in mainland China.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/8057624.stm


They may have released him but no doubt they are watching him like a hawk. He may want to stay indoors on the anniversary of the massacre. They are probably looking for any reason to throw him in jail again.
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Re: Chinese Political Scene

Postby pretzels on Tue May 19, 2009 7:10 pm

Is this the person who lives in exile but recently came back to China to visit family and got picked up by the authorities? There was something in the news about such a person.

Frankly, given how large the country is, it amazes me that the authorities have time to pick out persons to give difficulties too. Some sore spots don't heal fast.
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Re: Chinese Political Scene

Postby rodeorope on Sun May 31, 2009 3:30 pm

Hundreds marched through downtown Hong Kong on Sunday to mark the upcoming 20th anniversary of China's brutal crackdown on pro-democracy protesters at Beijing's Tiananmen Square in 1989. It was one of the few public commemorations on Chinese soil.

One student leader at Tiananmen was cheered as he was introduced to the crowd. "I feel like I have returned home," said Xiong Yan, a who lives in exile in the United States.

The protesters, many wearing black or white T-shirts for mourning, chanted, "The people will not forget" and "Reverse the verdict on June 4th" — a reference to the day of the deadly crackdown.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/31025712/


How many Chinese officials had spies in the crowd taking pictures of the protesters.
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Re: Chinese Political Scene

Postby deja vu on Thu Aug 27, 2009 9:54 am

China has criticised an invitation from Taiwan to the Dalai Lama, calling him a separatist who wants to sabotage improving cross-strait relations. Taiwan's president granted opposition requests for Tibet's spiritual leader to comfort victims of Typhoon Morakot. But a statement from Beijing's Taiwan Affairs Bureau said the Dalai Lama was not a "pure religious figure". "Under the pretext of religion, he has all along been engaged in separatist activities," the statement said. "He raises the religious banner and continues to carry out attempting to split the country."


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/8224831.stm


They need to give it a rest because they sound like a broken record on this issue. No one is listening and no one will do as they demand.
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Re: Chinese Political Scene

Postby CielOnTap on Sun Aug 30, 2009 1:59 pm

Ethnic rebels flee Burma for China
Aug 30, 2009 09:25 AM
Ng Han Guan
ASSOCIATED PRESS

MENG PENG, China – Hundreds of ethnic rebels have fled clashes in northeastern Burma, surrendering their weapons and uniforms to Chinese border police and crossing to safety after several days of skirmishes with Burma government troops.

The United Nations and Chinese officials say up to 30,000 civilian refugees have streamed into China to escape the fighting, which broke out last week after hundreds of Burma soldiers moved into Kokang, a mostly ethnic Chinese region run by a local militia.

Burma's junta is trying to consolidate control over several armed ethnic groups along its borders to ensure next year's national elections, the first in nearly 20 years, go smoothly. http://www.thestar.com/news/world/article/688479

The clashes have strained China's close relationship with Burma's military junta and come at a particularly sensitive time – ahead of Oct. 1 celebrations to mark 60 years of communist rule.

Beijing has asked Burma to end the fighting.


When China has a party, much respect is needed to convey the right tone that the government wants. Will the government hide these refugees or openly acknowledge them?
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Re: Chinese Political Scene

Postby CielOnTap on Tue Sep 15, 2009 1:26 pm

Party is no longer officially going to the beach for their annual meeting. The loss of business is somewhat offset by Russian tourists, but the community's long-simmering issues with the political party linger.

Sep 15, 2009



Life's no beach for China's leaders
By Antoaneta Bezlova

BEIDAIHE, China - The summer capital of China's political intrigue is taking a break from the years of intense infighting and maneuvering that Chinese communist leaders used to engage in while hidden in secluded villas there.

Beidaihe - a seaside resort about a two hours' train ride north of the capital - has surrendered its heavily guarded beaches to throngs of Russian tourists and no longer attracts media attention as the exclusive Communist Party resort.

It was here that many important party conclaves were held and some fateful decisions to "stay or go" for political supremos in Chinese communist hierarchy were made before announcing them to the public from the formal party halls in Beijing.

But when the 2,000-odd members of the all-powerful central committee of the party convene for their annual meeting this month in Beijing, Beidaihe will be hardly mentioned. Its status as a top leadership retreat has been downgraded by party chief Hu Jintao, who has promoted a more egalitarian approach and wants to nurture the party's populist image.http://www.atimes.com/atimes/China/KI15Ad01.html
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Re: Chinese Political Scene

Postby rocks on Tue Sep 22, 2009 11:58 am

China will increase efforts to improve energy efficiency and curb the rise in CO2 emissions, President Hu Jintao has told a UN climate summit in New York.

Mr Hu gave no details about the measures, which should mean emissions grow less quickly than the economy. The US, the world's other major emitter, said China's proposals were helpful but figures were needed. About 100 leaders are attending the talks, ahead of the Copenhagen summit which is due to approve a new treaty.

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said failure to agree a treaty in December would be "morally inexcusable". Negotiators for the Copenhagen summit are trying to agree on a replacement for the Kyoto Protocol to limit carbon emissions.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/8268077.stm


All talk, no show. They talked a good line to get the Olympics but we saw that what they say and what they do are 2 different things. I would say don't hold your breath but when in China, the air is so bad so most must feel like they have to. Also wear a mask just to survive being outside. They have a huge problem and it will be costly to fix the factories/mines/ rivers and I can't seem then going full tilt to fix it.
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Re: Chinese Political Scene

Postby CielOnTap on Thu Oct 22, 2009 10:24 pm

Oct 23, 2009



Hong Kong law under Beijing’s shadow
By Kent Ewing

HONG KONG - Where is Zhou Yongjun? A key figure in the 1989 Tiananmen Square uprising against the Chinese government, the 42-year-old dissident simply disappeared after traveling from Macau to Hong Kong on September 28 last year and hasn't been seen since. Zhou, who now lives in the United States and holds a Green Card entitling him to work there, was reportedly traveling on a forged Malaysian passport under a false name with the hope of visiting his family on the mainland.

Hong Kong authorities apparently seized him on his arrival from Macau. After that, his story turns into a dark mystery whose uncovered secrets could have profound implications for the "one country, two systems" formula that has governed the former British and Portuguese colonies of Hong Kong and Macau since their return to Chinese rule in 1997 and 1999, respectively. China’s then paramount leader, Deng Xiaoping, first uttered that famous dictum in 1984. http://www.atimes.com/atimes/China/KJ23Ad01.html
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Re: Chinese Political Scene

Postby CielOnTap on Tue Nov 03, 2009 4:10 pm

Business interests force China to political action in Africa
Published: 3 November 2009 17:30 | Changed: 3 November 2009 17:35
It is becoming increasingly difficult for China to stay politically neutral in Africa as its economic interests grow.
By Pauline Bax and Mark Schenkel
As night falls over Conakry, the capital of Guinea, the street lights only come on in the neighbourhood of Manquepas (which translated means ‘no lack’). In the other neighbourhoods, children do their homework by the candlelight of a petroleum lamp. Night watchmen read the Koran in the light from the sign for a petrol station. Grocers light their shop fronts with a neon light fed by a battery.

But in future, say the Chinese, everything will be different. The whole capital of Guinea will have electricity. Taxi drivers will no longer have to take six passengers at once in their rickety Peugeots, the capital will have a metro system. There will be flood control dams, new government offices, a fleet of passenger aircraft. Guinea will finally become modern, or so the Chinese promise. In exchange for that, all it has to do is supply raw materials like bauxite, oil and iron ore to China. http://www.nrc.nl/international/Features/article2404265.ece/Business_interests_force_China_to_political_action_in_Africa
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Re: Chinese Political Scene

Postby CielOnTap on Tue Dec 15, 2009 9:20 pm

Who in China's government would authorize someone in Sweden to spy on the Uighurs living in Sweden? Very underhanded and face-losing tactic.

Pensioner indicted over China spy scandal
Published: 15 Dec 09 15:37 CET

A 61-year-old pensioner has been indicted in Stockholm on charges of spying on behalf of the Chinese government.
Charges filed by prosecutor Tomas Lindstrand accuse the Mandarin-speaking Swedish citizen of illegally gathering intelligence on people of Uighur origin living in Sweden.

Intelligence agency Säpo arrested the suspect on June 4th after a lengthy investigation and surveillance period for allegedly gathering information on Sweden's 100-strong Uighur community.

The suspect came to Sweden as a political refugee in the 1990s. If convicted, he faces up to four years in prison.http://www.thelocal.se/23864/20091215/
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