Chinese Political Scene

Re: Chinese Political Scene

Postby rodeorope on Sat Nov 06, 2010 4:53 pm

Prominent Chinese artist Ai Weiwei said on Saturday he had been put under house arrest in connection with an argument with the government over the planned demolition of his studio in Shanghai.

"The police have announced that I am not allowed to leave my house," Ai told Reuters by telephone from his Beijing residence. "It's to do with what's happening over my studio. They say that it has been illegally built and want to demolish it," he said, adding he did not know when that might happen. "I expect my house arrest to end tomorrow evening," Ai said.


http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/40043071/ ... rtainment/


That is so lame. What happened? He didn't buy the building materials at a Gov't. run store? It's really pathetic when an artist can scare them so much they have to destroy his studio in the hopes of getting him to tow the line.

All he has to do is have his studio in his house now. Then again they will probably say the materials are not normal household items and not allowed. They seem to be getting more desperate every day. Every time they open their mouth they look desperate and just keep making bad decisions that make them look foolish.
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Re: Chinese Political Scene

Postby CielOnTap on Sat Nov 06, 2010 8:50 pm

Mild tangent to the "my father is Li Gang" situation, where a famous father is mentioned but without the death of other persons involved.

Ironic that the artist could do work for the games but his studio is not seen as permissible. Who or what is deciding the demolition? The action could be a form of rebuke to the artist, considering the article indicates that he has not had to stick closely to the rules.
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Re: Chinese Political Scene

Postby CielOnTap on Tue Dec 14, 2010 10:37 pm

8 minutes ago
Authorities rescue mentally ill workers enslaved in China factory, nab plant boss
BEIJING Authorities have rescued a group of mentally ill workers enslaved in a factory after being sold by a man who purportedly ran a beggars’ shelter, state media reported Wednesday.

Police on Tuesday nabbed Li Xinglin, the boss of the building materials factory in the far-western Xinjiang region who had fled Sunday after Chinese media reports exposed the plant’s working conditions, the official Xinhua News Agency said.

His son, Li Chenglong, was also nabbed in Chengdu, capital of southwestern Sichuan province, while the 12 mentally ill workers he had taken with him were placed in government custody.
http://www.thespec.com/news/world/article/301453--authorities-rescue-mentally-ill-workers-enslaved-in-china-factory-nab-plant-boss

How is it possible that the workers had that situation thrust upon them without someone interceding? Can the authorities realize a need to provide support services for these people and a protected workshop for them to work in?
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Re: Chinese Political Scene

Postby alohasand on Wed Dec 15, 2010 2:19 pm

Another father-son news story. What inspires family members to make opportunity at someone else's health cost? What will happen to the workers after their release? Is there a home they can go to or are they expected to live on the street?
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Re: Chinese Political Scene

Postby CielOnTap on Thu Feb 03, 2011 2:43 pm

We posted an item about the son of a Chinese official-the son killed a university student with his car and then stated how he was an official's son. http://www.speakezforums.com/viewtopic.php?f=41&t=1900&st=0&sk=t&sd=a&hilit=li+gang&start=30#p24192

Well, the son had the law deal with him and he's going to jail (for six years).
The father quickly tried to settle with the family out of court.

But the power of the Chinese Internet and the torrent of public outrage that it carried, ultimately forced the government to prosecute the younger Li.

He pled guilty to drunk driving and manslaughter while operating a motor vehicle. He was ordered to pay the Chen family $69,000 in compensation and $13,800 to the other student for her injuries.

http://www.thestar.com/news/world/article/930500--my-father-is-li-gang-accused-gets-six-years
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Re: Chinese Political Scene

Postby CielOnTap on Sun Mar 20, 2011 12:19 pm

03/18/2011

An Unwelcome Scent of Jasmine
Chinese Leadership Fears Its Own People
By Wieland Wagner in Beijing
Beijing is making sure Chinese pro-democracy activists, who have called for their own "Jasmine Revolution," do not succeed in emulating their North African counterparts. The leadership's crackdown borders on paranoia, but the Communist Party knows that the economic miracle that maintains social stability is at risk.

Everything is bright red, from the carpets to the chairs to the flags. In painstakingly determined sequence, Hu Jintao, the Chinese president and general secretary of the Communist Party, and his fellow members of the Chinese leadership walk into the Great Hall of the People, cheerfully applauding each other to the beat of a military band. The brightly colored costumes of national minorities, like the Tibetans and the Uyghurs, are included as an obligatory ethnic interlude.


At first glance, everything was just the way it is every year, when the National People's Congress, Beijing's show parliament, convenes and China's communists celebrate their successes. But something was different this time. It was as if an uninvited guest were disturbing the artificial show of harmony, someone who couldn't be mentioned by name but makes everyone nervous all the same.

Only in the Mind

The chimera that has the entire country on edge is called the "Jasmine Revolution." Activists on the Internet chose the term, inspired by the Tunisia rebellion of the same name, for a series of demonstrations in which the Chinese were to take to the streets to demand more freedom of expression. So far, however, such upheavals exist purely in the nervous minds of the country's leaders. The fascination with freedom that triggered the popular uprisings in faraway North Africa has not resonated in any measurable way with the 1.3 billion Chinese. This is because there is a world of difference between China's outlook for the future, a result of its economic successes, and the hopelessness the subjects of many Arab dictators face.http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/0,1518,751467,00.html
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Re: Chinese Political Scene

Postby CielOnTap on Sat Jun 11, 2011 9:30 pm

Three Gorges Dam--a massive public infrastructure project that was seen as a solution to many needs despite the flooding of several communities in order to make the project proceed. An item about the rising citizen dissent over the dam and weather and water issues caught my attention:

Today, 15 years later, criticism of the vaunted, $25-billion Three Gorges Dam , after an eternity of public silence, is rife. The worst drought to hit regions downstream from the dam in more than five decades has triggered a torrent of outspokenness – sources range from high officials to peasants – on a host of problems.

Critics point to an increase in earthquakes, poorly-handled resettlement efforts, pollution, silting, seas of algae, erosion, habitat destruction, floods, and now, drought – all attributed in various ways to the Three Gorges. No wonder the Shanghai Daily on Tuesday referred to the dam as “that monstrous damming project.”
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/asia-pacific/three-gorges-and-a-myriad-of-doubts/article2056811/

Yes, China had flooding recently in a drought-hit area.
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Re: Chinese Political Scene

Postby CielOnTap on Thu Sep 29, 2011 10:58 am

Greater China
Sep 30, 2011
China begins to watch out
By Clarissa Sebag-Montefiore

BEIJING - When Internet activist "Huaguoshan Zongshuji" published a survey of luxury watches worn by Chinese government officials this month, the move was commended by the state media. Yet weeks later the survey was censored - throwing the one-party state's uneasy relationship with corruption into the spotlight.

The government is leading a high-profile campaign against corruption amid growing public frustration. This has included use of the death penalty to make examples of officials who overstep the mark. Last month, the former chairman and general manager at the Sichuan branch of China Mobile, the world's largest mobile carrier going by the number of subscribers, was sentenced to death with a two-year reprieve for taking bribes. A "two-year reprieve" in most cases means that with good behavior the punishment is commuted to life in prison.

Despite the crackdown, bribery and graft are still widespread in massive state-run corporations, with a lack of free media or independent courts paving the way for abuse. China ranked 78th out of 179 countries on the 2010 Transparency International index.
The government is trying to demonstrate to an increasingly angry population that it is addressing the issue head-on, while being careful to protect its credibility by not exposing the true magnitude of official corruption, says Hu Xingdou, professor of economics at the Beijing Institute of Technology.
http://www.atimes.com/atimes/China/MI30Ad02.html

An important topic, officials who put self-interest in status before job responsibilities and public accountability. It is good that citizens are questioning the two realities.

The same matter arose in India last year, in connection with the construction of the Commonwealth Games' venues and athletes' lodging--money paid to contractors to do jobs while workers got a pittance in pay. The popular press had articles for months on the matter
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Re: Chinese Political Scene

Postby smitty on Fri Sep 30, 2011 1:38 pm

It is interesting with the communistic Govt China has, they are building up a lot of golf courses. So I WONDER who has he money for clubs, balls & golf time? Basically because I know golf is good for your health, but it is not CHEAP in North America.
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Re: Chinese Political Scene

Postby CielOnTap on Wed Nov 23, 2011 11:56 pm

I found an article that talks about how one country can have cause to laugh at another country's expense. What is of interest is that China's son of Li Gang case is used to contrast to the US situation of a campus security guard spraying peaceful protesters faces. Internet justice, if you will, that occurred after both events got to the online world.
http://www.atimes.com/atimes/China/MK24Ad01.html
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