Greek Political Scene

Re: Greek Political Scene

Postby CielOnTap on Wed Oct 23, 2013 10:23 pm

Yes, it can be possible to have children with recessive gene characteristics if they acquire one copy from Mom and the other copy from Dad. However, I understood DNA testing takes three weeks for the sample to rest on a special medium and track or spread its genetic traits on the the medium before analysis can be done with microscopes. How accurate is mouth swab testing in comparison (in the Irish childrens' situations)?

One of the articles regarding the minor Greek girl who was taken from Roma parents quoted a male Roma that was part of an association who said the girl's birth mother was Bulgarian (and had been in the camp) and she had given up the girl. So who is following up with the man to verify his story?

As for movement of people across borders: in the European Union, there is freedom to cross borders (Schengen area) by EU residents who live in countries that are members of the Schengen area. Only Greece is a member of the Schengen area but not Ireland nor Bulgaria.
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Re: Greek Political Scene

Postby CielOnTap on Thu Oct 24, 2013 11:52 am

Police in Bulgaria may have found the biological mother of the Greek girl "Maria"-the results of a DNA test are pending. The woman has been charged for selling the girl, although the mother stated she gave the child up without payment as she could not bring the child home to Bulgaria. The woman had worked in Greece as a domestic employee. In the article photo, the older of the two young children has a striking resemblance to the girl in Greece.

http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2013/10/24/greece_mystery_girl_bulgarian_woman_says_shes_been_questioned_in_maria_case.html

A Bulgarian newspaper in English has published a similar article.
http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=154888
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Re: Greek Political Scene

Postby CielOnTap on Fri Oct 25, 2013 12:14 pm

The Bulgarian couple have been confirmed as the birth parents of the little girl known as Maria in Greece. The Greek couple that had Maria indicated that they will apply for formal adoption of Maria once their legal matters are handled.

http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=154932

The Bulgarian news site also had another story about Maria-she was sent to a Greek family before but she was returned as she is cross-eyed. http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=154930

The child might be of age to attend school as she is reported to only speak a few words of Greek and of another language. How does she get to go to school? What about her other siblings in the Greek family-do they attend school yet?

Plans are to move the child to Bulgaria into social care. Third move for the child. http://www.novinite.com/view_news.php?id=154921
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Re: Greek Political Scene

Postby fishandchips on Mon Feb 24, 2014 9:50 pm

An efficiency report suggests that Greek olive oil be blended with non-olive oils. The notion is offending Greeks who revere their olive oil products. The report is part of the austerity efforts to cut costs, etc.

http://www.thestar.com/life/food_wine/2014/02/24/oliveoil_uproar_erupts_in_greece_over_cheaper_blended_product.html

Does the European Union dismiss the notion of origin products? Would the EU tell Portugal to mix its wines with non-Portuguese wines to help its austerity drive? How long would the EU last if French Champagne makers had to dilute and mix their products?
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Re: Greek Political Scene

Postby CielOnTap on Thu Aug 21, 2014 9:07 am

It's the tenth anniversary of the 2004 Greek Olympic Games and just like in February 2014, when images of abandoned Olympic venues in different countries were showing up online in slideshows, the Greek venues are again in the news. There is talk of privatising some of the sites. There is mixed feeling about the legacy of the the sporting event for Greeks.

Used for just 15 days, many sites have fallen into neglect. Some believe the cost of the Games contributed significantly to the financial crisis in Greece.

Others, such as volunteer Stella Ntala, remember 2004 fondly, but hoped Greece would change for the better in the aftermath of the competition.

“My strongest memory is the smiles of the people around me,” she said. “I will never forget how proud we were in 2004. We also hoped for a better future. We thought that Greece would become a better country because of the Games.”


http://www.euronews.com/2014/08/20/has-greece-forgotten-its-olympic-legacy/#.U_WjLnYuRpg.twitter
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Re: Greek Political Scene

Postby CielOnTap on Sat Jan 24, 2015 10:36 pm

To Greece, where an election is about to be held in some hours' time on Sunday. If an anti-austerity party wins the election, it could lead to Greece's exit from the European Union. Some European leaders are no longer worrying about such a scenario.

http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2015/01/24/how-greece-could-undo-the-eu.html
The Greek fight against Merkel and the EU is about much more than money. At its core, it is about the long-term sustainability of the union.

The election of a leftist party with murky economic intentions in Greece could also unravel European-centric policies of the EU and inadvertently bolster the anti-austerity, anti-European parties in Britain, France and Italy.

For this reason alone, the Greek election is larger in importance than the sum of its parts.

British Prime Minister David Cameron, who faces a general election this year amid the growing popularity of the United Kingdom Independence Party, is no doubt intently watching the Greek election. Cameron has promised to hold an “in or out” vote by 2017 on Britain leaving the EU.
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Re: Greek Political Scene

Postby CielOnTap on Sun Jan 25, 2015 5:09 pm

Newspaper reports that Syriza has won the election but it's not clear if the party is fully leading the country (with 151 of 300 seats) or whether it will need a coalition with another political party to govern Greece.

But it was unclear whether the communist-rooted party, led by 40-year-old Alexis Tsipras, had won by a big enough margin over Prime Minister Antonis Samaras' incumbent conservatives to govern alone. For that, they need a minimum 151 of parliament's 300 seats.

Official results from 17.6 percent of polling stations counted showed Syriza with 35 percent and Samaras' New Democracy with 29.3 percent. An exit poll on state-run Nerit TV projected Syriza as winning with between 36 and 38 percent, compared to ND with 26-28 percent.


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/25/greek-election-winner_n_6541878.html?ref=topbar

Article from Spiegel earlier this month explaining how Germany would view Greece's possible departure from the European Union:
http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/merkel-and-germany-open-to-possible-greek-euro-zone-exit-a-1011277.html
Core to the dispute remains the question as to what carries more weight: The Greeks' democratic will to leave behind austerity and cuts? Or the laws of the financial markets -- which would cease granting credit to Athens should it leave austerity behind -- combined with the unwillingness of other euro-zone member states to once again provide taxpayer money to bail Greece out?

As has so often been the case, European eyes are now on German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Until the middle of 2012, Greece's exit from the euro zone was seen as a possibility, if a risky one. But then, the chancellor fundamentally reconsidered her position on Greece, as she later told a small group of journalists, and made her decision: To save the euro in its entirety, Greece would have to remain in the common currency zone. There was, she said, "no alternative."

Expensive Campaign Promises

Things have changed and an alternative has in fact emerged: the cold shoulder. Furthermore, Merkel appears to be ready to show it to the Greeks. Should Syriza leader Alexis Tsipras become Greek prime minister and seek another debt haircut for his country while slowing down the reform process, a so-called "Grexit" from the euro zone would be the almost unavoidable consequence. Tsipras has made a number of expensive campaign promises in recent months, totaling over €10 billion ($11.95 billion). It is money that Greece doesn't have and which the markets likely aren't willing to make available.
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Re: Greek Political Scene

Postby pysanky on Thu Jan 29, 2015 12:38 pm

New prime minister Alexis Tsipras had a secularing swearing in event. He is atheist. He did call Archibishop to say not to come.
http://www.nwaonline.com/news/2015/jan/27/greek-leftist-sworn-in-forms-coalition-/
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Re: Greek Political Scene

Postby flipflop on Tue Mar 03, 2015 2:29 pm

The state minister is the first to arrive, 10 minutes early. Alekos Flambouraris, 72, wears a black suit, no tie and the kind of open-collared shirt made fashionable by the governing Syriza party in recent weeks. Flambouraris is a close confidant of Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras. "We need to keep up our contacts with the Germans. We want to explain ourselves," he says.

Athens' politically independent mayor, Georgios Kaminis, 60, arrives shortly thereafter on foot -- an inconspicuous man wearing a corduroy suitcoat. The others are: Natassa Bofiliou, 31, a famous Greek pop star who has been threatened by supporters of Golden Dawn because of her vocal opposition to the party; Christos Ikonomou, 44, whose book "Just Wait, Something's Happening," is a compilation of short stories about everyday life in Greece during the crisis; entrepreneur Aggeliki Papageorgiou, 50, the owner of a small ice cream spoon factory that is on the verge of shutting down; and journalist Xenia Kounalaki, 44, who writes for the center-right newspaper Kathimerini and has been disappointed thus far by Syriza's behavior in Europe.

http://www.spiegel.de/international/eur ... 20985.html

Does anyone really think things will change for the better in Greece or Egypt anytime soon? So much turmoil and in fighting has made it an unsafe place to live or visit. Even if things did improve for the better, there will be thousands that don't want change, they want the battle. Not satisfied to improve the situation and help the country.
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Re: Greek Political Scene

Postby CielOnTap on Tue Sep 29, 2015 12:46 pm

In case social media or online news sources did not get your attention, Alexis Tsipras is back as the Greek Prime Minister, having won the second election in 2015.http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/09/22/us-eurozone-greece-election-idUSKCN0RJ0US20150922

Where is Mr. Tsipras this week? Why, in New York City, of course. He needs to get more financing for Greece.

Pope Francis is a hard act to follow, but for Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, who has been in New York since Sunday, getting European "rock star" treament isn't the goal. Tsipras is in New York seeking more generous friends than he has found in the euro zone to help relieve Greece's massive debt burden.

Hat in hand and hitting the United Nations and Clinton Global Initiative, the Greek prime minister is hoping to form intergovernmental alliances that favor a "market friendly" restructuring of Greek debt held by the members of the euro zone, including the European austerity "hard line" members led by Germany.

http://www.cnbc.com/2015/09/28/the-endless-greek-debt-drama-has-finally-hit-the-us.html
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