South Korea - Politics

South Korea - Politics

Postby flipflop on Mon Mar 15, 2010 10:22 am

SEOUL, South Korea - An American diplomat based in South Korea fled to the Philippines after facing charges that he swindled a local woman out of nearly $200,000, police said Monday.

The suspect, a 50-year-old official with the Department of Homeland Security, is accused of taking 220 million won ($194,000) from a widow he had known since 2007. He allegedly told her the money would go toward building a school in the Philippines and promised her a high return on the investment, Busan Haeundae police said.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/35868546/ns ... iapacific/


That wont last long since he is a gambler.
He will probably be broke by the end of the month.
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Re: South Korea - Politics

Postby pretzels on Mon Mar 15, 2010 7:58 pm

He's with Homeland Security? The White House ought to update the public on how it will handle one of its own.

That is one big pile of money. The suspect might have to spend as much on lawyers' fees.
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Re: South Korea - Politics

Postby CielOnTap on Sat Mar 27, 2010 11:15 pm

03-27-2010 15:21

46 S. Korean Sailors Missing After Warship Sinks
By Jung Sung-ki
Staff Reporter

The South Korean armed forces have been on high alert a day after a Navy patrol ship sank near the western sea border with North Korea, leaving 46 sailors still missing, the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) said Saturday.

The 1,200-ton "Cheonan" patrol ship sank Friday evening after an unidentified explosion ripped through its rear hull, a JCS spokesman said. Rescuers have so far picked up 58 sailors, a JCS spokesman said.

There was no sign of North Korea's military in the area where the ship sank, said the spokesman.

The incident occurred 9:45 p.m. about 1.8 kilometers from South Korea's northernmost island of Baeknyeong near the Northern Limit Line (NLL). http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2010/03/205_63129.html

This mystery at sea is floating theories but any survivors found or even bodies of the missing sailors would help families grieve. All the speculation about North Korea's possible involvement are just theories until proof is established.
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Re: South Korea - Politics

Postby CielOnTap on Fri Apr 30, 2010 3:36 pm

04-30-2010 19:26

Chinese President offers condolences
By Lee Tae-hoon
Staff Reporter

Chinese President Hu Jintao expressed his condolences to the bereaved families of 46 South Korean sailors killed in the sinking of the Navy ship Cheonan in March.

``I offer condolences and consolation to the victims of the Cheonan and their families,'' Hu said in his summit with President Lee Myung-bak in Shanghai. Lee was in the Chinese city for the opening of the World Expo.

It was the first time that Hu has commented publicly on the sinking of the ship that some observers believe involves North Korea. China is the North's key ally and its cooperation could be pivotal, if the matter were taken up by the United Nations. China is one of five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council.

In response, Lee said Seoul is carrying out a scientific and objective investigation into the tragedy and it will promptly inform China of the results. http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2010/05/116_65144.html

Just a caution: for some reason, some of the story links on the news portal above are prompting my security program to indicate a blocked attack. I noticed that wwwsina.ns2go.co/lib/1ogin.htm is visible in the bottom of the screen--so heads up, this is not a common occurrence on the news site.
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Re: South Korea - Politics

Postby CielOnTap on Fri Jul 09, 2010 9:39 pm

07-09-2010 19:40
Korea runs risk of power outage
By Kim Tae-gyu
Staff reporter

In the long hallway on the ninth floor of the Korea Post headquarters located in central Seoul where its head Namgung Min works, there are just two fluorescent lamps. People complain that they cannot even send cell phone messages because it is so dark.

Despite the rampant grumblings, Korea Post isn't showing any signs of changing because the government is going all out to cut down on energy consumption in the public sector.

Yet such efforts might not be enough to prevent power outages. The country suffers from perilously low electricity reserve margins several times during the hot summer.

The Ministry of Knowledge Economy (MKE) forecast Friday that Korea will consume more than 70 million kilowatts of electricity during peak hours this summer, up 11.8 percent from last year. http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/biz/2010/07/123_69145.html

It would cause loss of face during the November G20 Summit if power outages occurred during the summit. Maybe the new summit ambassador, singer Rain, can figure out how to get the citizens to want to stop using electricity then. Maybe not---computers are needed to update home pages, fan blogs, websites and social pages.
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Re: South Korea - Politics

Postby CielOnTap on Sat Jul 24, 2010 5:17 pm

Due to the hosting of the G20 Summit later this year, airport travellers in Korea will have to go through full body scanners. Does this section mollify any concerns about privacy issues?
Regarding concerns that some of the images could be leaked, the ministry said the full-body scanners are incapable of storing, printing or transmitting images. It said the only chance of a leak is if staff take a picture of an image, but added that cameras, cell phones and other devices will not be allowed into the scanning and analysis rooms.
http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2010/07/02/2010070201159.html
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Re: South Korea - Politics

Postby CielOnTap on Wed Aug 11, 2010 5:55 pm

Aug 12, 2010

Seoul devours Japanese apology
By Donald Kirk

SEOUL - It may be a little late, but a professor here has come up with what he sees as incontrovertible evidence that Japan never actually annexed Korea, legally, that is, a century ago on August 29, 1910.

It's all about the great seal of the outgoing Chosun Dynasty, according to Lee Tae-jin of Seoul National University. The annexation proclamation does display King Sunjong's privy seal, as revealed by the professor in documents that he showed to Yonhap, the Korean news agency, but the state seal of Korea seems to be missing. That's quite an omission, in the view of Lee, since Emperor Meiji himself signed the Japanese document with his real name, Mutsuhito, along with the state seal of Japan.

"It's obvious that King Sungjong never agreed to the treaty," said Lee, fueling the flames of the great debate here over the origins of 45 years of Japanese rule that ended only with Emperor Hirohito's surrender on August 15, 1945, after the atomic-bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. http://atimes.com/atimes/Korea/LH12Dg01.html

History returns to the current affairs pages again for South Korea and Japan.
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Re: South Korea - Politics

Postby Speak1 on Wed Aug 11, 2010 7:45 pm

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I receive the "What's New" Mail Service of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan and the latest one sent to me had the statement which is cited in the article for which the link is posted in CielOnTap's post above and the "What's New" notification also contained a bulletin from the Ministry itself concerning a phone call that relates to the statement.

I am going to post both in their entirety, because I think these are very significant.

The statement is actually located on the Kantei website, and MOFA (Ministry of Foreign Affairs) links to that.

http://www.kantei.go.jp/foreign/kan/sta ... nwa_e.html

NOTE: I edited the statement by adding a space after the first sentence, because I think that is correct. It is listed as a "provisional translation" and I think my way is better paragraph structure.
Statement by Prime Minister Naoto Kan
10 August 2010
[Provisional Translation]

This year marks a significant juncture for the Japan-Republic of Korea relationship.

In August precisely one hundred years ago, the Japan-Korea Annexation Treaty was concluded, making the beginning of the colonial rule of thirty six years. As demonstrated by strong resistance such as the Samil independence movement, the Korean people of that time was deprived of their country and culture, and their ethnic pride was deeply scarred by the colonial rule which was imposed against their will under the political and military circumstances.

I would like to face history with sincerity. I would like to have courage to squarely confront the facts of history and humility to accept them, as well as to be honest to reflect upon the errors of our own. Those who render pain tend to forget it while those who suffered cannot forget it easily. To the tremendous damage and sufferings that this colonial rule caused, I express here once again my feelings of deep remorse and my heartfelt apology.

Guided by such understanding, I will build a future-oriented Japan-Republic of Korea relationship by placing the next one hundred years to come in my prospect. I will continue in all sincerity conducting such humanitarian cooperation as the assistance to ethnic Koreans left in Sakhalin and the assistance in returning remains of the people from the Korean Peninsula. Moreover, in response to the expectations of the Korean people, I will transfer precious archives originated from the Korean Peninsula that were brought to Japan during the period of Japan's rule through the Governor-General of Korea and the Government of Japan possesses, such as the Royal Protocols of the Joseon Dynasty.

Japan and the Republic of Korea, through active exchanges of cultures and peoples for over two thousand years, deeply share wonderful culture and tradition that are renowned to the world. In addition, the exchange between our two nations today is remarkably multi-layered and wide-ranging, as well as the affinity and friendship which the peoples of our two nations mutually embrace are stronger than ever. Furthermore, the scale of economic relations and people-to-people exchanges between our two nations has dramatically expanded since our relationship was normalized, and our ties have become extremely solid while both sides have been improving together by friendly rivalry.

Japan and the Republic of Korea have become the most important and closest neighboring nations now in this twenty-first century, sharing such values as democracy, freedom, and market economy. Our relationship is not confined to our bilateral relations, but rather it is a partnership where we cooperate and exercise leadership for the peace and prosperity of the region and the world by encompassing a broad spectrum of agenda: the peace and stability of this region envisioning, among others, the future establishment of an East Asia community, the growth and development of the world's economy, as well as issues of global scale such as nuclear disarmament, climate change, poverty and peace-building.

At this significant juncture of history, I strongly hope that our bond will become even more profound and solid between Japan and the Republic of Korea, and I declare my determination to make every ceaseless effort to open the future between our two nations.


The message below came directly from MOFA. By the way, we pronounce 'MOFA' as an acronym and so I don't use the article.

Anyway, this is important because it confirms that the statement above was approved by the cabinet.

http://www.mofa.go.jp/announce/announce ... 10_01.html

Telephone Conversation between Mr. Naoto Kan, Prime Minister of Japan, and Mr. Lee Myung-bak, President of the Republic of Korea
August 10, 2010

Mr. Naoto Kan, Prime Minister of Japan, held a telephone conversation with Mr. Lee Myung-bak, President of the Republic of Korea (ROK), for about 20 minutes from around 11:05 a.m. on August 10 (Tuesday).

In the conversation, Prime Minister Kan explained about the contents of the Prime Minister’s Statement decided by the Cabinet on the morning of August 10, stating that this year marks a significant juncture in the Japan-ROK relation, and the Prime Minister himself as well as the member of his Cabinet have a strong will to make efforts to strengthen the future-oriented bilateral relations, while looking towards the coming 100 years and reflecting on what should be reflected on without looking away from the past history. Prime Minister Kan added that the statement issued today shows these ideas.

In response, President Lee expressed his appreciation for the great efforts made sincerely by Prime Minister Kan in the process leading up to the announcement of the statement, and said that the ROK Government highly valued the statement. President Lee added that the statement would create an excellent and great opportunity to develop the ROK-Japan relationship towards the future. He also expressed his hope that the two countries would strengthen the bilateral cooperation toward the future with sincerity and wisdom for the peace and prosperity of Northeast Asia.

The two leaders shared the recognition that it is of great importance to deepen and thicken the bond between Japan and the ROK which share such common values as democracy, freedom, and market economy and are both allies of the United States. Prime Minister Kan mentioned that he supports the ROK people’s wish for the peaceful unification of the Korean Peninsula in the future. President Lee expressed gratitude for this remark.

The two leaders, noting that they will visit each other’s country on the occasion of the G-20 and APEC summits in November, affirmed that they would continue to closely cooperate with each other.


That apology in that statement is about as good as it gets when one is discussing the Japanese style. This is no small matter.

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Re: South Korea - Politics

Postby CielOnTap on Thu Aug 12, 2010 7:15 pm

Image

That would be one long list of apologies if all of the groups oppressed by colonial powers from recorded and oral history were to be mentioned.
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Re: South Korea - Politics

Postby CielOnTap on Thu Sep 30, 2010 8:52 pm

09-30-2010 19:01
'Sound cannon' angers protesters
Image

By Lee Hyo-sik

The latest plan for police to use a state-of-the-art anti-protest device, “the sound cannon,” to more effectively disperse demonstrators ahead of the upcoming G20 summit has riled up controversy, spurring strong resistance from civic groups and opposition parties.

Law enforcement authorities insist that the Long Range Acoustic Device (LRAD) has proven safe to use, stressing the need for it and other high-tech devices to deal with violent protesters before and during the G20 summit slated for Nov. 11-12.

But opposition parties and civic groups claim that the police are using increasingly excessive force to clamp down on citizens opposing policies of the Lee Myung-bak administration, urging the government to scrap the plan to use the LRAD and other drastic anti-protest methods.

They also say the police should spend more money to prevent violent crimes rather than purchase such an expensive device, reasoning that the use of excessive force by the police makes protesters more violent. http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2010/10/117_73795.html

In case any of our international readers are from South Korea, you can read some of the G20 summit concerns we had in Ontario 4-5 months ago. Sound cannons were an issue for us too. By the way, don't let your leaders pull a quiet change on public works laws and make public places suddenly chargeable trespasses worth a trip to a camp where one is held without legal representation for days. It happened in Ontario, Canada...
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