Two Countries, One Question. Independence

Two Countries, One Question. Independence

Postby deja vu on Mon Apr 23, 2012 10:16 pm

Do you agree that Scotland should be an independent country? That is the question Scotland’s separatist First Minister, Alex Salmond, proposes to put to Scottish voters in a referendum sometime in late 2014. Ten words, no subordinate clauses, its meaning incapable of confusion. Compare it with this little essay in obscurity:

Do you agree that Quebec should become sovereign after having made a formal offer to Canada for a new economic and political partnership within the scope of the bill respecting the future of Quebec and of the agreement signed on June 12, 1995?.


(The punctuation is what was used in the original article. Link below.)

http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/201 ... eparatism/


I do think that the vote in Scotland will have a trickle down effect in Canada. Quebec and the independence question is never far from the surface and this may bring it to light again.

Like here, the Brits won't have a say on vote day. We have been through this once and it is a real possibility that it can happen again. I'm not sure if Quebec is totally prepared to go it alone.

Scotland, on the other hand, seems to be ready. I think it will survive a yes vote and come out on top over time. It won't be without its problems if the yes side wins, but I think they can handle it.

Sitting on the sidelines will be hard for the Brits, but it's not like Scotland is voting themselves off the island. They will still be there the next day. Once the dust settles, I think both sides will realize that not much has changed after all. Family and friends are still going to be living side by side. A border won't change that and it will be a friendly border.
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Re: Two Countries, One Question. Independence

Postby keychain on Wed Sep 10, 2014 12:52 pm

Spooked by recent polls, Prime Minister David Cameron and other British political leaders rushed north to Scotland on Wednesday, where Cameron begged Scots not to break his heart by voting to become independent from the United Kingdom.

Cameron's personal plea aimed to keep the 307-year-old union between England and Scotland intact and prevent himself from going down in history as the U.K. prime minister who lost Scotland. He is likely to face calls from his Conservative Party to step down if Scots vote to secede.

In a rare display of cross-party unanimity, Cameron, Labour leader Ed Miliband and Liberal Democrat chief Nick Clegg all pulled out of a weekly House of Commons question session in London to make a late campaign dash to Scotland as polls suggest the two sides are neck-and-neck ahead of the Sept. 18 independence referendum.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/scotland-i ... -1.2761589

Enough already with the fear mongering. How silly to think that Cameron's statement will make a difference, or that a new royal baby is coming would sway those that want independence for Scotland. As for the idea that Cameron would be aske to step down is ridiculous. It's called democracy and up to Scotland and Scotland alone to decide Yes or No. Not Cameron's or the other UK parties. Leave them alone and let them decide and personally I am for the Yes side. I think in the long run it will be good for Scotland and think the rest of the UK will survive the transition. I just hope it's a fair vote and count so the 2 countries can move on from there.

A Yes vote may have the Irish thinking about independence as well. Might be a wise idea, but wont end the fighting between Protestant and Catholics, but that conversation is for another time. Back to Scotland and their vote. I hope Yes wins and then they can truly be free to choose their path without interference from London.
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Re: Two Countries, One Question. Independence

Postby mousepad on Sat Sep 13, 2014 10:44 pm

Would independence benefit Edinburgh? Acres of ink has been spilt covering the claims of Yes and No about the consequences of independence for Scotland as a whole, but much less attention has been paid to what the decision means for Edinburgh.

Not a moment too soon, former Evening News editor John McLellan gave his views on this issue yesterday, and it’s fair to say he thinks the glass of independence would be at best half empty for the Capital. I take a rather more optimistic view.

First, though, there’s a lot that wouldn’t necessarily change. The City of Edinburgh Council wouldn’t automatically get any more powers, say, to adopt a more progressive form of local taxation: that’s already decided by Holyrood. However, one of the inspiring features of the referendum campaign has been rejection of “politics as usual”; it’s difficult to see the transformation of local government being put off much longer.

http://www.edinburghnews.scotsman.com/n ... -1-3540736

What the heck is all of the fuss about. People will vote, they will hear the results and nothing will change immediately. Lots to be done before a YES vote would create an independent country.

People will go to sleep that evening and get up for work or school the next. Nothing will change for at least 1 1/2 - 2 years down the road. All need to chill out and just let the vote happen. Democracy at work if the nay sayers would take a rest and stop trying to scare everyone.
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Re: Two Countries, One Question. Independence

Postby deja vu on Fri Sep 19, 2014 3:51 pm

LABOUR leader Ed Miliband has said that “change begins today” after Scotland voted to remain part of the United Kingdom.

Mr Miliband said Scotland’s decision was a “vote for change” and that having worked to keep the country together, they must now change it together. He was speaking at the Emirates Arena in Glasgow where he was joined by Better Together leader Alistair Darling, Scottish Labour leader Johann Lamont and other senior party figures. Mr Miliband also had a message for disappointed Yes voters.

http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/t ... -1-3547337

Sadly the no side won, but the yes side came close. Now it's time for all of the promises made to Scotland to stay to take shape. The PM and company made a lot and both sides expect the promises to be kept, or else. If they were false promises than they have a lot to answer for. Both sides want change and it's about time.
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