UK Referendum - The Great Debate

UK Referendum - The Great Debate

Postby deja vu on Wed Jun 22, 2016 12:36 pm

Will they stay or will the go? That is the big money question in the UK right now and tomorrow is D Day.

David Cameron, Jeremy Corbyn and Tim Farron are addressing rallies arguing the UK will be better off and safer with a Remain vote in Thursday's poll. Boris Johnson and Nigel Farage are appealing to their own Leave supporters - with the ex-London mayor urging people to "believe in our country". More than 46 million people are eligible to vote in the referendum.


http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-eu- ... m-36594834

The article contains some morre links for one to read. From what I hear it may be too close to call, but isn't that what they always say in times like this? Seems the UK is leaning to bailing on the EU, but what is the price they pay no matter how the vote turns out? I don't begin to understand all that will be involved if they leave, but it would mean a lot of work and time to sort it all out.

Can they go back to the time before joining the EU without causing a major crisis in their economy?
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Re: UK Referendum - The Great Debate

Postby no1home on Fri Jun 24, 2016 10:27 am

The UK, including Wales, Scotland and Ireland has spoken and the world woke up to a victory for the leave side. Out of that vote, comes some dissent from Scotland and Ireland who voted to stay in the EU. Talk of those 2 holding their own vote on "should we stay or should we go", and for Scotland it would be their second vote on it in a very short time. Could this be the end of the UK as we know it, quite possible and the world will have a better idea of what they decide to do in the upcoming days/weeks.

The fact that both are talking about it within hours of the final vote, it could be sooner rather than later. The markets, which I do not begin to understand, have taken a deep hit, but most seem to be coming on TV and say it will settle down just be patient.

A little surprised that UK PM David Cameron will step down. He fought hard to stay and it strikes me that he should have just manned up and work to move the UK forward. He would have to overcome the fact he misread the vote so badly though. Sure he put all his eggs into one basket, but I would have liked to see how he could say OK we lost, but now we will work together to deal with the future. I don't think the former mayor of London is the right guy to take over as PM and a lot of those that wanted to stay in the EU are blaming him for the vote outcome, but he did not hold the pencil for people to mark their X either way. The people have spoken so time to accept and work on what comes next so mistakes are not made.

BBC News -

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-36615028

Prime Minister David Cameron is to step down by October after the UK voted to leave the European Union.

Speaking outside 10 Downing Street, he said "fresh leadership" was needed. The PM had urged the country to vote Remain but was defeated by 52% to 48% despite London, Scotland and Northern Ireland backing staying in. UKIP leader Nigel Farage hailed it as the UK's "independence day", while Boris Johnson said the result would not mean "pulling up the drawbridge".



Edinburgh Evening News -

http://www.edinburghnews.scotsman.com/n ... -1-4162797

NICOLA Sturgeon has put Scotland on course for a second referendum within the next two years and three months in a bid to achieve independence before the United Kingdom exits the European Union. The First Minister said a second Scottish independence referendum was now “highly likely” with Scotland facing withdrawal from the EU despite a strong Remain vote north of the border.



Irish Times -

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics ... -1.2697704

Sinn Féin has said it will intensify its push for a Border poll on a united Ireland following Britain’s decision to exit the European Union.

Northern Ireland Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness said the referendum result in favour of Brexit means the “British government has forfeited any mandate to represent the economic or political interests of the people” in the North.

Northern Ireland voted in favour of remaining in the EU, but by a smaller margin than had been anticipated. On a turnout of 63 per cent, 55.8 per cent of people voted to remain in the EU while 44.2 per cent opted to leave. Turnout in nationalist areas was relatively low.



North Wales Chronicle -

http://www.northwaleschronicle.co.uk/ne ... leave.aspx

VOTERS in North West Wales were split on the decision of whether or not the UK should leave the European Union.

Gwynedd was one of only five areas in Wales to vote for the UK to remain a member of the EU in Thursday's EU Referendum. The remain box was ticked by 35,517 people in the county, while 25,665 voted to leave. Turnout in Gwynedd was just over 72 per cent as 61,245 voters went to the polls.

Anglesey voted to leave, with 19,333 voting for an exit while 18,618 voted remain. Turnout on Anglesey was 74 per cent with 37,981 people taking part in the ballot.
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Re: UK Referendum - The Great Debate

Postby deja vu on Sat Jun 25, 2016 8:49 am

The petition, set up by William Oliver Healey, states: "We the undersigned call upon HM Government to implement a rule that if the Remain or Leave vote is less than 60%, based on a turnout less than 75%, there should be another referendum."

Thursday saw a 72.2% turnout, significantly higher than the 66.1% turnout at last year's general election, but below the 75% mark suggested by Mr Healey as a threshold.


http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-eu- ... m-36629324

A little too late for that now, and it just says poor loser and trying to undermine the democratic vote. 50% plus 1 is all they needed and they ended up with 52%. There is no turning back now, and changing the rules after the vote is just wrong, can not see anyone accepting that. Time to stop what the press is calling Whining, roll up the the sleeves and get to work.

It was a fair and democratic vote and if all the losing sides in the world, kept changing the rules to suit their side, the world would be in a bigger mess than it is now.

In the mean time, it's usually Americans wanting to move to Canada after a Presidential Election, or unpopular rulings from their Supreme Court, now it's some Brits thinking the same thing. Did they not get the memo that we are not part of the EU?

http://globalnews.ca/news/2784868/brexi ... nion-vote/

Earlier this year, Americans were threatening to move to Canada if Donald Trump becomes president. The same threat was made in November over the States’ plan to allow Syrian refugees in the country.

And in the summer of 2015, social media lit up with the same threat after the U.S. Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage in all 50 states. Canada had legalized same sex marriage in 2005.



I think the best take on this comes from the Huffington Post -

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2016/06/24 ... 54478.html

Brexit Has Made Canada Look A Lot More Appealing To Many Brits



From Canoe News -

http://cnews.canoe.com/CNEWS/Canada/201 ... 46032.html


Better hurry up, Brits. The anti-Trump migrants are already taking up all the good igloos. Once again, in the aftermath of the U.K.'s vote to leave the European Union, those who lost the vote appear to be seeking a common Plan B: move to Canada.

Data from Google Trends show a sharp spike in "move to Canada" searches coming from Britain -- 100 times more searches compared to 24 hours earlier.


The Canada search was a clear favourite, beating out British searches looking into other places to move, such as the United States or Australia, making the Great White North the No. 1 dream destination - once again - of political losers.
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Re: UK Referendum - The Great Debate

Postby ice cream on Mon Jun 27, 2016 12:23 pm

Around 52% of voters in the UK voted to leave the EU, but many have been criticised online by Remain voters.

Young Leave voters have told Newsbeat that they've been labelled racist and xenophobic for their political views. It has resulted in many Leave voters staying silent on social media for fear of attack and criticism. "The main place I received abuse was on Twitter," 19-year-old Thomas Proudfoot tells Newsbeat.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/3 ... endum-vote


What a greal way for adults to show children how to be a bad loser and not a gracious one living in a democracy. Teaching them to bully, verbally abuse on line and in person. The Brits are showing just how nasty anyne can be when they do not get their own way.
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