Japanese Politics

Re: Japanese Politics

Postby CielOnTap on Wed Aug 12, 2009 8:31 pm

Thursday, Aug. 13, 2009
ELECTION 2009
Parties wave flag for child-rearing
But policies intended to woo young voters don't address failings in caring for kids: critics
By MARIKO KATO
Staff writer
Child-rearing support is a focal issue in the campaign for the Aug. 30 election as the two main parties fight to woo parents, especially those who both work or have young children.

The ruling Liberal Democratic Party and its main rival, the Democratic Party of Japan, are focusing on child-rearing and their strategies for curbing the low birthrate, which is a national concern because of the significance it holds for Japan's future economic well-being.

For family voters, too, child-rearing support is considered vital. According to a 2005 survey by the National Institute of Population and Social Security Research, the expense is the biggest reason why married couples do not have as many children as they want, with two-thirds expressing such a view. http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/nn20090813f1.html

The classic vote-gaining ploy: if you vote for our party, it will pay/sponsor ------ for you and your family. Newsflash: citizens and residents recall how long the Diet debated giving money to households to help them stimulate the economy. Childcare is not a quick fix--how long with the debates on money to families vs increasing the care facilities and attractively paying those who would be guardians of the children in their care? Poor pay means no staff. Growing minds do best with little staff turnover to help kids feel secure and confident in their environment.
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Re: Japanese Politics

Postby 123duyusee on Wed Aug 12, 2009 10:24 pm

Suddenly into money, are the political parties? Then whyever did they not spend their way into improving quality of life for people? No more concrete structures but more human investment and support.

Guess the political party issues seem like white wool, no longer dirty or oriented around influence issues or impropriety. If the ballots would show the parties the door...
The count is in...
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Re: Japanese Politics

Postby CielOnTap on Fri Aug 28, 2009 3:01 pm

Lost in Japan’s Election Season: The Economy
By MARTIN FACKLER
Published: August 28, 2009
TOKYO — While Japanese voters seem poised to end the Liberal Democratic Party’s long hold on power on Sunday, the momentous election has focused surprisingly little attention on the pressing problems that threaten the world’s second largest economy.

Japan’s challenges are enormous, and growing in severity. The nation is still in search of a new recipe for growth almost two decades after its export-driven model hit the skids. And now it must also find a way to pay for a rapidly aging population, despite a crushing government debt that will soon grow to twice as large as its $5 trillion economy.

Japan’s weakness was exposed during the current financial crisis, when its economy fell harder than other major economies — shrinking an annualized 11.7 percent in the first quarter. The government of Prime Minister Taro Aso responded with a $270 billion dose of old-style public works spending that has so far produced only a small rebound, economists say. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/29/world/asia/29japan.html?_r=1&ref=global-home

Will there be a real change in the leadership of the country? Only the voters can determine which candidates are deemed trustworthy to go to the Diet and develop plans for the country.
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Re: Japanese Politics

Postby dreamon on Sun Aug 30, 2009 9:35 am

The Democratic Party of Japan was cruising toward a landslide win Sunday evening in the Lower House election, on course to grab more than 300 seats in the 480-seat chamber, early voting results and Kyodo exit polling showed.

The projected win by the main opposition party would end more than half a century of almost uninterrupted rule by the Liberal Democratic Party. It would also usher in DPJ President Yukio Hatoyama, 62, as the new prime minister by mid-September. As of 8:30 p.m., the DPJ-led opposition camp had already secured 206 seats against just 51 for the LDP-New Komeito ruling bloc, according to early results from Kyodo.

Major TV stations' exit polls also showed a crushing defeat for the LDP.


http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/ ... 830x2.html


Time will tell if this is an improvement or just more of the same old song and dance.

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Re: Japanese Politics

Postby CielOnTap on Mon Aug 31, 2009 6:17 pm

08-31-2009 18:59
President Wants Mature Partnership With Japan
By Kim Sue-young
Staff Reporter

President Lee Myung-bak Monday sent a congratulatory message to Yukio Hatoyama, leader of the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ), on its landslide victory in general elections, expressing hopes for a "consolidated, mature partnership."

The party crushed the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) and ended the conservatives' 54-year grip on power by winning more than 300 of 480 seats up for grabs.

"I am sure that Japan will achieve a consistent development and make a contribution to the world peace and mutual prosperity under the leadership of Chairman Hatoyama," Lee said. http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2009/09/116_51012.html

Messages move quickly between established governing leaders and the new incoming leader of Japan. Do press secretaries draft the messages or do the leaders have ideas that are then put into written messages/video bites?
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Re: Japanese Politics

Postby CielOnTap on Tue Sep 01, 2009 1:14 pm

09/01/2009

The World from Berlin
'A Mandate to Put an End to Japan's Postwar Period'
Japanese voters came out in record numbers Sunday to dethrone the party which has ruled their country for over 50 years. German commentators welcome the change but worry that the future government might not have what it takes to cure this country of its economic malaise and social ills.

Japanese voters made history Sunday by by voting out of power the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), which had ruled Japan almost uninterruptedly since 1955.

"People had been fed up for a long time," Yoshio Matsumura, a shopkeeper from Saitama prefecture, told the Associated Press. "Their frustration reached a boiling point, and they finally rose up." The frustration ended up meaning that the LDP lost two-thirds of its seats in Japan's lower house of parliament.

The man now most likely to take the reins is Yukio Hatoyama, 62, the leader of the left-leaning Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ), a loose alliance of LDP defectors, socialists and progressives, which won 308 seats of the 480 seats in the lower house of parliament. Hatomaya is expected to assemble a government in mid-September.http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/0,1518,646303,00.html
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Re: Japanese Politics

Postby alohasand on Tue Sep 01, 2009 1:40 pm

Politicians have to show the voters how the party in power to come will be different from other parties. Time to make a plan for Japan that says "we're taking care of the people and the economy and there's work for all to do."
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Re: Japanese Politics

Postby deja vu on Wed Sep 02, 2009 5:28 pm

TOKYO - Japan's next prime minister might be nicknamed "the alien," but it's his wife who claims to have had a close encounter with another world.

"While my body was asleep, I think my soul rode on a triangular-shaped UFO and went to Venus," Miyuki Hatoyama, the wife of premier-in-waiting Yukio Hatoyama, wrote in a book published last year. "It was a very beautiful place and it was really green." Yukio Hatoyama is due to be voted in as premier on Sept. 16 following his party's crushing election victory over the long-ruling Liberal Democratic Party Sunday.

Miyuki, 66, described the extraterrestrial experience, which she said took place some 20 years ago, in a book entitled "Very Strange Things I've Encountered."


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/32659678/ns ... iapacific/


Vivid imagination, watching too much sci-fi before sleeping, or a bit off the wall? Take your pick, but her saying that "she eats an imaginary sun" is not helping her case. Quirky, unique, missing a few brain cells, or just having a good time and doesn't care what others think?
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Re: Japanese Politics

Postby fishandchips on Wed Sep 02, 2009 6:16 pm

She can provide interviews for slow political news days but then husband's bureaucrats might advise her to tone down her opinions on various subjects. She will add some interest in the early days of cabinet. Let's hope that the new government makes progress on various issues this year.
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Re: Japanese Politics

Postby CielOnTap on Fri Sep 25, 2009 8:59 pm

Sep 24, 2009
Cautious welcome for Japan's Asia drive
By Jian Junbo

SHANGHAI - It seems Japan's foreign policy is at a turning point as Yukio Hatoyama of the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) takes over as the nation's new prime minister. In accordance with the DPJ's platform in election campaigns, the new ruling party is likely to attach less importance to the United States-Japan relationship and seek a more independent role for Japan in international society; or, at least, the DPJ may want to reduce the dominance of the US in Japan's foreign policy.

Hatoyama this week met Chinese President Hu Jintao in New York on the sidelines of a United Nations conference to improve ties between the two countries. Hatoyama will also pay a state visit to China after the UN meeting. He is reportedly eager to discuss with Chinese leaders the formation of a so-called East Asian community, an idea that was highlighted in the DPJ's election platform as a key point of its foreign policy. http://www.atimes.com/atimes/China/KI24Ad01.html

Politically speaking, there seems to be an alphabet soup of summits and organizations around the globe. Southeast Asia has ASEAN, which I thought that Japan was a part of. No, Japan is not a member of ASEAN.
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