Japanese Politics

Re: Japanese Politics

Postby fishandchips on Mon Apr 06, 2009 5:02 pm

as well as to support nursing and medical services.
Are pay hikes for staff in the offing? Japan has ambulances wasting precious time finding a hospital to take emergency patients in because there aren't doctors available.
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Re: Japanese Politics

Postby yukon on Sun Apr 12, 2009 8:46 pm

72% say Ozawa should resign, Aso Cabinet support rate up: survey

About 72 percent of respondents in a phone survey said Democratic Party of Japan President Ichiro Ozawa should resign over a political funds scandal that has led to the indictment of his secretary, the Mainichi Shimbun newspaper said Sunday.

The support rate for Prime Minister Taro Aso's Cabinet rose 8 percentage points from the previous survey in March to 24 percent, with Aso surpassing Ozawa as more fit to be prime minister for the first time in six months, the daily reported.

According to the poll, 21 percent of the respondents said Aso was more suitable as prime minister, compared with 12 percent for Ozawa of the main opposition DPJ, although the disapproval rating for the current Cabinet remained high at 56 percent.


http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/ ... 413a2.html
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Re: Japanese Politics

Postby deja vu on Mon Apr 20, 2009 7:49 pm

Attack on bureaucrat pay ousts city mayor


Shinichi Takehara, mayor of Akune, Kagoshima Prefecture, was ousted by lawmakers after criticizing bureaucrats' pay, saying most earned more than three times the average salary of the city's 24,000 citizens.

Assembly members in the seaside city voted 11 to 5 late Friday to remove Takehara, 50, from office. Takehara in February said in his blog the salaries were too high and sapped the city's budget.

"The mayor has damaged Akune's reputation, and we can't continue under his leadership," said Takayuki Kinoshita, a lawmaker who supported the no-confidence vote. "He has been insulting assembly members through his blog since his inauguration."

http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/ ... 421n1.html


An honest politician that gets canned for letting the financial dirty laundry out in the open. I wonder if the voters will reward him with a win and kick the others out that wanted to keep the secret.
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Re: Japanese Politics

Postby out in space on Mon Apr 27, 2009 6:37 pm

Hereditary politicians a fact of life
Some in LDP call for curbs on blue bloods


What does Prime Minister Taro Aso have in common with predecessors Yasuo Fukuda, Shinzo Abe, Junichiro Koizumi and Yoshiro Mori, and others who came before them?

They are all political blue bloods whose fathers, grandfathers or other close relatives were political notables, some prime ministers. This trend is especially conspicuous in the ruling Liberal Democratic Party.

Such aristocracy is all too common in Nagata-cho, the nation's political hub.

Koizumi, a third-generation lawmaker and one of the most popular prime ministers in recent years, has no plans to run in the next election and has already effectively passed his baton onto his son, Shinjiro, who will be expected to "inherit" his Kanagawa Prefecture electoral district.


http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/ ... 427a2.html


The next election will come and go and then it will all be forgotten till the next time.
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Re: Japanese Politics

Postby CielOnTap on Mon Apr 27, 2009 8:09 pm

Inheriting an electoral district does not sound democratic unless the voting constituents vote in favour of the next generation family member. Passing off the district before an election? The person with the next most votes from the previous elections should get the district seat for the remainder of the term.

Nepotism is otherwise a valid charge.
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Re: Japanese Politics

Postby no1home on Mon May 04, 2009 10:49 pm

Prime Minister Taro Aso suggested Sunday a general election could be held around the time of the July 12 Tokyo Metropolitan Assembly election, although New Komeito, the coalition partner of Aso's Liberal Democratic Party, does not want a poll then.

"If asked which should take precedence — the Lower House election or the Tokyo Metropolitan Assembly poll — then it is the Lower House election," Aso said here.

New Komeito has insisted the general election should not take place around the time of the metro poll as it wants to concentrate its efforts on the local election. Tokyo is the major power base for the party, which is backed by Soka Gakkai, an influential lay Buddhist organization.


http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/ ... 505a5.html
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Re: Japanese Politics

Postby deja vu on Mon May 11, 2009 7:14 pm

Bowing to pressure from within the Democratic Party of Japan, Ichiro Ozawa surprised the political world Monday by announcing his resignation as DPJ president to take responsibility for the political fundraising scandal involving his chief aide.

Ozawa's resignation, although not effective immediately, comes at a critical time as both the ruling and opposition camps gird for a general election that must be held before Lower House members' terms end in September.

The two names being floated as his possible successor — Katsuya Okada and Naoto Kan — are both past DPJ presidents.

"I will take time thinking (about running for the party presidency)," Okada said later. "What matters is who can achieve the regime change as the party leader."

http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/ ... 512a1.html


~~~~~~~~~~~~


With Democratic Party of Japan President Ichiro Ozawa intending to resign over a political fundraising scandal, the party may regain some momentum for the upcoming general election, analysts say.

This could be bad news for Prime Minister Taro Aso, who has been enjoying a surge in the support rating for his Cabinet. Norihiko Narita, president of Surugadai University in Saitama Prefecture, pointed out that the public's discontent was not with the DPJ but with Ozawa.

"Now that the DPJ is able to remove this big obstacle, it is going to have the wind at its back," Narita said, adding that if Ozawa had remained in his post, he was likely to have evoked even more public resentment.

http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/ ... 512a2.html
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Re: Japanese Politics

Postby deja vu on Sun May 17, 2009 11:58 am

Democratic Party of Japan chose Yukio Hatoyama as its new president Saturday by a relatively large margin over Katsuya Okada, who was the more popular candidate among the public in opinion polls.

The DPJ, as the largest opposition force and most powerful party in the Upper House, could be the next ruling party depending on the Lower House general election. This means Hatoyama, grandson of a former prime minister, could hold the No. 1 office himself before the year is out.

"All along, our rival has been the ruling Liberal Democratic Party-New Komeito bloc and not each other," Hatoyama said after he was elected. "There were no sides the minute the election ended."


http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/ ... 517a2.html
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Re: Japanese Politics

Postby ice cream on Tue Jul 21, 2009 1:20 pm

The House of Representatives was dissolved at its plenary session Tuesday. Prime Minister Taro Aso's plan to call a general election on Aug. 30, with campaigning to start Aug. 18, will be endorsed at a Cabinet meeting later in the day. Aso is set to hold a press conference at his office at 6 p.m.

All Cabinet members signed the dissolution document including Finance Minister Kaoru Yosano as well as Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Minister Shigeru Ishiba, who have both appeared cautious about dissolving the lower house soon after their Liberal Democratic Party's crushing defeat in the Tokyo Metropolitan Assembly poll.

http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/ ... 721x1.html


Only 2 weeks of campaigning before you vote? Seems longer, probably because of those loud speakers day and night are deafening and annoying. Buy earplugs and hope that drowns out the noise.
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Re: Japanese Politics

Postby 123duyusee on Tue Jul 21, 2009 4:40 pm

Families were promised money in February to help them help the economy but the money did not go out until two months or so later. Then families had to go to town hall or something in order to "qualify" for the dough.

Summertime campaigning for two weeks--some assistants are probably spending their "break" drafting speeches for each day of the campaign while publicity is figuring out which suits and lighting show the candidates in the best way for photos. Printers will be busy. Probably cell phone companies too.
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