Retail stores keep changing their customer experiences

Re: Retail stores keep changing their customer experiences

Postby CielOnTap on Sat Apr 28, 2012 5:00 pm

Telling the staff that their work is appreciated is good on many levels:
1) staff will remember the customers who told them so;
2) the feedback comes during the transaction/service;
3) the customer is not anonymous and not coming by word of management's say so or a comment form;
4) the comments provide a story to share with other staff in the break room (guess who else will be on the lookout to help you next time?);
5) gives the customer and the staff good feelings to them both.
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Re: Retail stores keep changing their customer experiences

Postby smitty on Tue May 08, 2012 1:37 pm

A food store & I were in trouble the other day.

First of all a week plus ago I thought I had lot my Visa & my bank is the bank of Commerce. So we get the straightened out & the new Visa could come to the Bank or the Post Office & said make it the Post Office for when about to make an update on a Visa they had used the Post office.

THEN I find the LOST Visa in my wallet in the business card spot, a place I do not use for me Debit Card or Visa.

Think it would come to the post office yesterday I found that was correct so put the outdated one in my left pocket knowing when home I would cut it up.

Bought food products from the grocery store & reached into my left pocket (the normal place for my Debit Card when I will definately buy food or such.) THEN I hand it is as a debit card ONLY this is the out of date or you name it to the cashier. Well that gal tried time & time again, customers were fed up in waiting the extra time, to also a more senior woman to come down & after running the card to several times the SAME only that is when SHE realized this was an outdated Visa & not my Debit Card.

So went to the Bank of commerce & chap wrote out the mess we had to the frustration of others at the time. Also I had drived to the bank to bring up this matter. THEY HAVE TO HAVE THEM 75% DIFFERENT & NO SMALL PRINT.

So things can happen when they should not. The cashier should have read the small print & I should of as well, but they Visa to the Debit Card almost look look the same with VISA at the lower left of BOTH OF THEM. THAT IS WRONG.

True on a rare occasion of two I have topped up the petrol tank of my m/c & used my VISA instead of the Debit Card, but at least on the Visa it was my signature that was needed.
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Re: Retail stores keep changing their customer experiences

Postby deja vu on Wed Feb 12, 2014 3:52 pm

Sears Canada just make the worst change in retail history and destroyed customer service for not only the lady involved, but anyone that has seen the story. I have never had an issue with Sears, but after seeing this, I will not be giving them my business.

I hope this lady has a great lawyer to really beat the heck out of them in court. They don't have a leg to stand on and given what happened to the lady, they should be given the riot act by the judge, anything less is inexcusable. I hope she is seeking her money back in full plus interest, pay her court costs and money for pain and suffering due to the unnecessary stress they caused her. I'm not surprised the so called Supervisor wasn't available. Sears is not the only one that pulls that nonsense to avoid talking to a customer and they wont be the last.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/ ... -1.2532476


A Fort Saskatchewan, Alta., woman who is recovering from a heart attack says she counted on Sears to provide superior service when she wanted new windows installed.

Instead, Joan Greenough tells CBC in a Go Public investigation, staff at the financially troubled retail giant called police and had her charged with trespassing when she refused to leave the store after demanding to know what happened to almost $7,000 she had paid the company. She has a court appearance set for later this month.

Greenough's dealings with Sears Home Services began in October 2013 when she signed a contract for $11,905 for new windows for her rental property.



I don't see how Sears can have a leg to stand on. They accepted her payment at the store despite having sold that end of their business, so it does make it their responsibility not only to inform her of the change, but do so before she handed over the cash. They kept quiet until Go Public became involved and I'm not surprised. Thanks to Go Public a lot of big Canadian business can't hide from what they tried or did pull on consumers and it forced them to come clean and make changes. Go Public is the best weapon Canadian consumers have against bad customer service.
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Re: Retail stores keep changing their customer experiences

Postby CielOnTap on Fri Feb 14, 2014 10:50 am

Sobeys grocery stores have stores called Extra because of Extra departments: cheese, nutrition, pharmacy, hot foods. When a grocery store is renovated, it's always worthwhile to see if ergonomics have changed, aisles have changed, what the new things are (carts, shelf layouts, dept, third party vendors like wine stores or drycleaning, food lines) and if any new rooms or services are supplied. Cooking classes can be a good way to expand one's culinary dishes and be steps away from the sections selling the very things you need to make the dishes again at home.

As Canadians get older, mobility issues and ease of access favour one-floor layouts, keeping stairs or elevators out of the equation unless there is a need to access 2nd floor dining areas, washrooms or classrooms. However older stores that have not had accessiblity improvements within the last five years will be impacted by customers who find it easier to shop in newer stores than ones with steps, awkward carts or shelving and poor lighting.
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Re: Retail stores keep changing their customer experiences

Postby CielOnTap on Fri Mar 28, 2014 1:19 pm

Yorkdale Shopping Centre (Toronto, Ontario in Canada)may be adding some international shopping excitement to the mall. I saw an article that Japanese brand Uniqlo is in negotiations with Yorkdale. The mall is a fashion destination mall with many designer brand stores along with familiar chain stores.
http://www.torontolife.com/style/toronto-shopping/2014/03/26/uniqlo-opening-flagship-yorkdale/

The company's website in Japanese (with a sprinkling of English):
http://www.uniqlo.com/jp/
or the US version:
http://www.uniqlo.com/us/

That store would draw people from downtown Toronto, though downtown Toronto would be a better location (due to the presence of university populations, international students at English language colleges and the commuter crowds in the financial district/City of Toronto offices/retail malls during the daytime). If there was retail space at Queens Quay and TTC service along Queens Quay from the George Brown College Waterfront campus to the Queens Quay retail complex, the Loblaws store with its Joe Fresh store would only be a few blocks away. There would be lots of interest in the two clothing stores.
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Re: Retail stores keep changing their customer experiences

Postby CielOnTap on Fri May 16, 2014 1:40 pm

Outlet malls are the big box experiences that have customers walk from store to store outside, maybe with a canopy or not above the walkways. The malls tend to favour car drivers as any public or coach transit stop tends to be given the farthest corner of a parking lot. The Niagara Region in Ontario just opened a new outlet mall called the Outlet Collection at Niagara.

Outlet stores tend to sell off discounted merchandise from their regular retail stores or even buy lots of merchandise from other chain stores or manufacturers to sell at attractive prices to their regular and daytripper customers. Outlet stores may be in industrial parks, suburban plazas or warehouse sites, so you may have to find out how to reach them, especially if they are near highway interchanges.

Len's Mill Store falls into the outlet store category. Recently I had explored their ladies' sock selection, which includes office black and navy crew socks, some trouser sock options, colourful sport socks and tights, some in neutral tones and some in vivid colours. The prices are very attractive-you may find the selection better than a department store, depending on the location you are visiting.
There is a small assortment of tops/underwear/jackets for both men and women. Kids might stand a chance at an outfit for everyday.
Bedding and food items are also carried, along with impulse buys like jewelery, snack foods, perfume and crafting notions or supplies.
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Re: Retail stores keep changing their customer experiences

Postby CielOnTap on Thu Jun 26, 2014 4:53 pm

Sobey's had purchased Safeway stores and was required to sell 23 stores in Western Canada as part of regulations. However, in Ontario some Sobey's stores are closing, some to become Freshco grocery stores. An article in today's paper talks about the real estate changes for Sobey's.
http://www.thestar.com/business/2014/06/26/sobeys_to_close_50_supermarkets_increases_share_dividend.html
The retailer took a $169.8 million restructuring charge in its latest quarter related to the store closures as it reported sharply lower earnings.

The grocer, No. 2 in Canada after Loblaw, said the move will shave about $400 million or about 1.9 per cent off its future annual sales.

“It’s pretty rare for one grocery chain to say they’re closing 50 stores. That’s a lot of stores,” said Rob Gerlsbeck, editor of Canadian Grocer.

“It’s a big deal, but it’s part of the competitive nature of the market overall,” said analyst Kevin Grier of the George Morris Centre in Guelph, referring to price wars with other big grocery chains Loblaw and Metro along with Walmart and Costco.
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Re: Retail stores keep changing their customer experiences

Postby southernfry on Wed Jul 16, 2014 2:48 pm

Comcast never wants a customer to go -- but says one of its representatives went too far trying to convince one account-holder to stay.

On Tuesday, the cable company apologized to Ryan Block and his wife, Veronica Belmont, after the couple's attempts to cancel were stymied by a phone call with a customer service representative that Block called "straight up belligerent." The incident garnered attention because Block and Belmont posted a partial recording of the conversation on the Internet.


Of course, setting aside specific tactics like the pestering experienced by Block and Belmont, customer retention is a critical component of the cable and satellite business.

Comcast, DirecTV (DTV), Verizon (VZ, Tech30) and other companies work hard to keep "churn" -- a term for customers coming and going -- as low as possible.


http://money.cnn.com/2014/07/15/media/c ... ?hpt=hp_t2

Looks good on paper, BUT the reality is things like this happen all the time. How to fix the problem before it happens is the one thing business can't
seem to get a handle on.
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Re: Retail stores keep changing their customer experiences

Postby deja vu on Wed Oct 08, 2014 12:08 pm

Wal-Mart is eliminating health benefits for about 30,000 employees to control its rising health care costs.

The cut applies to part-timers who work fewer than 30 hours a week -- about 2% of the company's U.S. workforce. More of Wal-Mart's employees signed up for health benefits this year than the company expected, which boosted the company's costs. One reason for the increase in sign-ups could be Obamacare, which requires most everyone to have health coverage, though Wal-Mart did not make that connection.

http://money.cnn.com/2014/10/07/news/ec ... ?hpt=hp_t4

Talk about pulling a fast one, I wonder if this decision would hold up in court. Plus they are going to charge almost 4.00 more a paycheck to cover those that are still registered, another fast one. Wal-Mart didn't do their homework and the part-timers are paying the price.

Question is what will this do to their morale and will customer service take a further hit as a result?
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Re: Retail stores keep changing their customer experiences

Postby CielOnTap on Wed Jan 14, 2015 11:52 pm

A Canadian retailer, Tilley Endurables, had advertised in yesterday's Globe and Mail that the business is up for sale. The owner, Alex Tilley, is retiring and has volunteer travel plans. He'd like the potential buyer(s) to invest and to bring the company to the next level and if possible, keep the Canadian manufacturing in place.

Tilley founded his company with the goal of designing his idea of the perfect sailing hat. Quickly the company built its reputation in Canada for making durable hats, jackets and other products, many which came with lifetime guarantees.


http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/alex-tilley-makes-plans-to-hang-up-his-hat-puts-tilley-endurables-up-for-sale/article22436987/
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