Dumbest Moments in Business

Re: Dumbest Moments in Business

Postby signs on Thu Jan 02, 2014 8:39 pm

This may qualify in some way -

http://bc.ctvnews.ca/are-flushable-wipe ... -1.1612263



Are flushable wipes really flushable?

In Consumer Reports’ standard tests, toilet paper breaks down quickly. But when testers ran the same test with the flushable wipes they didn’t break down at all. Testers gave up after ten minutes. They even ran them for another ten minutes in a mixer, but the wipes still didn’t break apart. After soaking overnight, two of the products, Cottonelle and Scott, did eventually break down. But even after 12 hours, the ones from Charmin and Equate stayed in one piece. Consumer Reports testers say if you do decide to use these products, don’t flush them down the toilet.



One of those burning questions, right? Just like flushable litter, it may be down the toilet. :lol:
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Re: Dumbest Moments in Business

Postby keychain on Mon Feb 17, 2014 10:15 pm

"Back to the Future II" was full of tech we drooled over. While the Hoverboard, flying cars and instant Pizza Hut are some way off, Marty McFly’s Nike trainers with power laces are to become a reality.

When Marty and Doc set a course for 2015 (this was the actual year they went to in the movie, feel old?) to blend in they needed to dress like futurites. Marty slipped on a self-adjusting jacket and put on a pair of awesome runners that automatically laced themselves up. Before our very eyes they fastened to his feet. “Power laces!” Marty cried. Now you could be doing the same next year after Nike designer Tinker Hatfield confirmed at an event in New Orleans that power laces were coming for 2015.

http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2014/02/17/ ... =obnetwork

Either this is bloody stupid or bloody brilliant.

They will probably come with a big price tag and I thought, who would buy into this hype. They are just shoelaces, no magical powers, just laces so save your dough. Then realized there are some that will want them just to say they have them no matter the cost. :roll: :roll:
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Re: Dumbest Moments in Business

Postby dreamon on Sun Sep 28, 2014 5:01 pm

Virgin Group founder and chairman, Richard Branson, announced via his website Tuesday, that he’s giving his whole personal staff unlimited vacation days.

The Financial Times reported that the rules apply to about 170 staff at the Virgin head offices in the U.K. and U.S.


http://www.cbc.ca/newsblogs/yourcommuni ... right.html

Time will tell if this is a dumb moment or a brilliant business move. I wonder if all will be honest and only take it when necessary or take
advantage of the situation.

Here's how it works: "It is left to the employee alone to decide if and when he or she feels like taking a few hours, a day, a week or a month off, the assumption being that they are only going to do it when they feel a hundred per cent comfortable that they and their team are up to date on every project and that their absence will not in any way damage the business – or, for that matter, their careers!"


The majority of the work force would probably love to work for a company that offered this benefit.

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Re: Dumbest Moments in Business

Postby deja vu on Thu Dec 17, 2015 11:56 am

What he did qualifies as cruel and dumb and now he is getting it back in spades. People are cheering this move and frankly he deserves it even though the charges have nothing to do with him raising the price of a life saving drug. No one cares, I think they feel he is getting what is coming to him any way the law can do it.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/martin- ... -1.3369271

Pharmaceutical entrepreneur Martin Shkreli, vilified for buying up drug companies and then dramatically boosting the prices of some medications, has been charged by the FBI with securities fraud related to his former hedge fund and a drug company he once ran. Shkreli, 32, currently the CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals, was taken into custody at his New York City home Thursday.

The case relates to his dealings at two firms, including Retrophin Inc., a biopharmaceutical company that he founded and used to head. Shkreli's arrest also stems from his time as manager of hedge fund MSMB Capital Management.



http://www.cbc.ca/news/turing-drug-price-1.3337195

After weeks of criticism from patients, doctors and other drugmakers for hiking a life-saving medicine's price more than fifty-fold, Turing Pharmaceuticals is reneging on its pledge to cut the $750-per-pill price.

Instead, the small biotech company is reducing what it charges hospitals, by up to 50 per cent, for its parasitic infection treatment, Daraprim. Most patients' copayments will be capped at $10 or less a month. But insurers will be stuck with the bulk of the $750 tab. That drives up future treatment and insurance costs. Daraprim is a 62-year-old pill whose patent expired decades ago. It's the preferred treatment for a rare parasitic infection, toxoplasmosis, which mainly threatens people with weak immune systems, such as HIV and organ transplant patients, and pregnant women, because it can kill their baby.
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