A Coffee Addict's Guide to the World

They May or May Not Be Healthy, But ...

A Coffee Addict's Guide to the World

Postby keychain on Thu Dec 15, 2011 2:03 pm

Choosing a cup of coffee is about more than just milk or sugar. From the Ethiopian countryside where coffee was first discovered to the baroque cafes of imperial Europe to the high-tech streets of Tokyo, coffee has adapted to almost every culture--even infiltrating tea-loving strongholds such as India and Hong Kong. Here's your global guide to regional coffee styles: some that have caught on across the globe, some that represent a unique link to the area--and some that are just plain weird.

http://www.foxnews.com/travel/2011/12/1 ... -to-world/


How do you take yours? Black, cream/sugar, latte overload?

It's mind boggling how many choices are out there.
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Re: A Coffee Addict's Guide to the World

Postby coffee101 on Thu Feb 23, 2012 6:08 pm

Dozing off on the chairlift? Need a little more pep so you don't stall out mid-mogul? Well, dear ski enthusiast, you
might want to point your tips toward the world's very first ski-through Starbucks. That's right: Your Joe to go while
still on the snow. You never have to leave your skis to get all the buzz you please.


http://www.hlntv.com/article/2012/02/22 ... pt=hp_bn13


Wish they had one when I use to ski. It's a good idea and will rake in the cash, I
just wonder what took them so long
Conscience keeps more people awake than coffee.
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Re: A Coffee Addict's Guide to the World

Postby deja vu on Tue Dec 11, 2012 3:54 pm

Elephant Dung Coffee.

Not a joke, but would you pay as much as 50.00 for a small cup? I don't drink coffee, so the answer is easy for me, but what about the coffee lovers out there. Would you try unique coffees for your fix?


http://www.nbcnews.com/travel/itinerari ... -1C7490082


GOLDEN TRIANGLE, Thailand -- In the lush hills of northern Thailand, a herd of 20 elephants is helping to excrete some of the world's most expensive coffee. Trumpeted as earthy in flavor and smooth on the palate, the exotic new brew is made from beans eaten by Thai elephants and plucked a day later from their dung. A gut reaction inside the elephant creates what its founder calls the coffee's unique taste.

Stomach turning or oddly alluring, this is not just one of the world's most unusual specialty coffees. At $1,100 per kilogram ($500 per pound), it's also among the world's priciest.
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Re: A Coffee Addict's Guide to the World

Postby 123duyusee on Wed Dec 12, 2012 9:57 pm

Depends on what medical side effects one gets from drinking the coffee. Sure sounds like an expensive niche coffee but until there is some testing, my yuck factor says no thank you to the elephant variant of coffee.

Coffee in some restaurants is a production piece-there are those fancy Italian coffee machines, or the coffee ceremony in Ethiopian restaurants, or just even the choice of some coffee blends to cap off a dinner out.
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Re: A Coffee Addict's Guide to the World

Postby coffee101 on Mon Dec 28, 2015 1:15 pm

Hipsters, rejoice! Your beards might be going out of fashion, and the skinny jeans may be far more uncomfortable than you would ever admit, but the coffee? Well, it just might be doing you good. And for those already thinking ahead to a post-Christmas health kick, it is not necessary to strike your single-origin beans off the menu, unless you have a particular health condition that makes it advisable to do so.

In fact, says Professor Clare Collins of the Dieticians Association of Australia, "One of the first things that people give up when they go on a health kick is coffee, and that's a crazy thing to do, because there's evidence of health benefits.

http://www.goodfood.com.au/good-food/dr ... lq02j.html

Collins has undertaken a systematic review of all the studies related to coffee and its health effects, and says there is good news for coffee drinkers: they have a lower risk of dying unexpectedly and developing type 2 diabetes than those who do not drink coffee, and are less likely to develop liver cancer.

So why does it always feel like coffee is something of a dietary no-no; that it's bad for us? One of the reasons may be that there's so much conflicting information about caffeine in general and coffee in particular, and as in all things, some studies are better than others.


It's what you add to it and how much which seems the one thing all can agree on. It's the studies you have to take with a grain of salt, after all it is easy to find those that say it's all bad for you and another that says the opposite. So many studies, and they wonder why consumers are confused.
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