Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Respect

That's what we see from space. Let's try to keep it that way.

Re: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Respect

Postby CielOnTap on Sat May 23, 2009 6:19 pm

This new plastic bag rule in Toronto isn't just for the grocery stores--it is for all stores. I cannot see boxes being offered to take home drycleaning in, nor paper bags for a bulky clothing purchase (i.e. coat). Restaurants are going to have to juggle more customer expectations with takeout orders or leftovers going home--several boxes are going to need a bag.

Few retailers happy about bag-fee policy

FACTS ABOUT THE FEE
Toronto's plastic bag fee takes effect on June 1. According to the city's website, here's what to expect:

Retailers must charge a minimum of 5 cents for each plastic shopping bag requested by the customer. If plastic retail shopping bags are not offered, retailers must provide a free alternative that is recyclable (i.e., paper bag, cardboard box).

The bag charge, detailing the number of bags dispensed to the customer and the total amount charged, must be recorded on the receipt (if one is issued).

Retailers must accept the use of any reusable containers (i.e., cloth bags, bins, boxes) brought in by customers to carry their purchases.

Retailers are entitled to keep the money received from the plastic bag charge.As date nears for 5-cent charge on plastic sacks, some shop owners are confused, others defiant.

May 23, 2009 04:30 AM
John Spears
CITY HALL BUREAU

Cathy Dernick's eyes widen in surprise as she learns that come June 1, she's supposed to start charging customers at her north Toronto women's clothing shop five cents for every plastic shopping bag they use.

"I didn't know that," says Dernick, then adds: "Poop. In this economy."

Only the word she used wasn't "poop."

Welcome to the front line of Toronto's new rule requiring all retailers to charge five cents for each single-use plastic bag as of June 1.http://www.thestar.com/news/article/639193
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Re: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Respect

Postby CielOnTap on Sun May 24, 2009 9:21 pm

Australians have a reason to be ashamed about their e-waste: only 4% is dealt with in the country and cargo ships headed to Asia were brought back, as they carried Australian e-waste.

Toxic Australian e-waste dumped on China
Ben Cubby, Environment Reporter

May 22, 2009

$35 waste tax to keep old TVs out of landfill
Advertisement
ILLEGAL shipments of electronic waste from Australian homes - old computers, televisions and mobile phones - have been seized from cargo vessels, part of a little-known smuggling trade that fuels child labour and toxic pollution in China.

Since the start of last year, 12 ships carrying "e-waste" have been intercepted leaving Australia for Asian ports without hazardous materials permits, including four so far this year, Australian Customs and the Department of Environment confirmed yesterday. These seizures were the tip of the iceberg, recycling industry sources told the Herald.

Only about 4 per cent of the nation's e-waste is recycled, the Environment Department says. Most of the rest goes into landfill, and an unknown proportion is shipped overseas illegally.http://www.smh.com.au/environment/toxic-australian-ewaste-dumped-on-china-20090521-bh6f.html

Then there is the matter of paying a television disposal fee in Australia:

$35 waste tax to keep old TVs out of landfill
Ben Cubby, Environment Reporter
May 23, 2009
AUSTRALIANS face a new tax on electronic goods such as televisions and computers next year - in return for guarantees the electronic waste will not be dumped in landfill or shipped overseas.

The Federal Government is also considering a national scheme for refunds on bottles and cans and will hold public consultations.

But the national plan to ban plastic bags, which the Environment Minister, Peter Garrett, had backed unequivocally in the past, appears to have been dropped.http://www.smh.com.au/environment/35-waste-tax-to-keep-old-tvs-out-of-landfill-20090522-bia9.html
The tax could prevent Australians from being lax about waste disposal as well as curbing consumer tendencies. One can go without television.
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Re: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Respect

Postby CielOnTap on Mon Jun 22, 2009 1:25 pm

How a German town is working to save on streetlight bills--having a phone to request 15 min of light is different!

06/22/2009
Village Develops Street Lights-on-Demand System
In an effort to save money, a village in central Germany has opted to turn off its street lights. But residents have no need to be in the dark: Using a mobile phone and code, they can order lighting for up to 15 minutes.

A village in central Germany has patented a new way to cut electricity costs without leaving its more nocturnal residents in the dark -- with street lighting that can be ordered by phone.

The village of Dörentrup in Lemgo county -- located about 100 kilometers (62 miles) from Hanover -- decided to turn off street lamps earlier on some of its roads a few years ago. With a dearth of drivers using the stretches at night, it made no sense to keep the lights on all night long. http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/0,1518,631730,00.html

It might affect travellers' ability to see house numbers and streets signs if they don't know the area nor the method of obtaining light. But residents still have to have a mobile phone in order to make use of the new light system.
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Re: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Respect

Postby CielOnTap on Fri Jul 10, 2009 2:08 pm

Corporate cleanup in Switzerland--staff does some good and a popular spot gets lightened up.

P&G sends 600 staff for Geneva cleanup
by Malcolm Curtis
Geneva - 08 July 2009 | 11:00
American multinational Procter & Gamble sends almost a quarter of its staff from its European hadquarters in Geneva on a one-day campaign to clean up the city's popular harbour walkway area. Hundreds of employees are engaged in the blitz to remove cigarette butts and garbage from the area ringing Lake Geneva in an operation coordinated with the city’s public works department. A spokeswoman from the company says it is part of a broader effort to reach out to the community.
International companies are sometimes accused of not fully integrating with the communities where they operate in Switzerland but one American multinational took action on Tuesday to prove the opposite.

Procter & Gamble, the consumer goods giant, arranged for 600 of its employees to help out in a clean-up blitz of Geneva’s harbour front, known in French as the “Rade.”

As part of a public-private partnership, the employees picked up cigarette butts and litter along the walkway around Lake Geneva, one of the most heavily visited spots in the city. http://www.swisster.ch/en/news/business/pg-sends-600-staff-for-geneva-cleanup_116-2060135
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Re: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Respect

Postby CielOnTap on Wed Sep 02, 2009 9:00 pm

The telephone directory represents the digital divide between individuals relying on the print directories and others who'd rather use the online version. Then there are the distribution jobs at stake if delivery is discontinued. How to resolve the directory dilemma?

Quebec man targets Yellow Pages drop-off
Last Updated: Wednesday, September 2, 2009 | 6:11 PM ET
CBC News
A Montreal man fed up with the thick Yellow Pages brick delivered to his house every year has launched an online campaign to organize a mass return of the book.

"I get that in the past, it was useful, when there was no internet," Bohbot told CBC News. "But these days, there are more people with internet than not." http://www.cbc.ca/canada/montreal/story/2009/09/02/montreal-yellow-pages.html
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Re: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Respect

Postby smitty on Mon Sep 07, 2009 3:18 pm

In regard to fast food places to some restaurants. I have noted when riding along the mountain roads, that close to some town or even a mobile home place there will be the orange/red bags at the road side. Meaning some of those living in said areas are out trying to clean up all the things throwen out of cars & so much of it comes from the fast food places.

Obviously on a m/c I cannot be throwing things out to the ditch for I must have both hands on the handlebars & there simply is no way to eat or drink something WITHOUT loosing one's best concentration of the road to the traffic. True a few might, but so few & they are indangering themselves though not realizing it, since a m/c is only two wheels that require BALANCE while a car is self-balanced with four-wheels.

True I might be chewing on a small square of gum, which keeps my salava working as it should, as I do in gym work or such. When one of the gum containers becomes empty I will dump it into the waste-bin at home or at a sensible place AND NOT throw if off to the side.
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Re: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Respect

Postby CielOnTap on Sat Oct 31, 2009 8:02 pm

Smart meter phase-in sparks cost fears
By Tyler Hamilton, Energy and Technology Columnist
Published On Fri Oct 30
Hey big spender, want to become part of Toronto's power elite? Do your laundry and run the dishwasher in the late afternoon.

About 250,000 households in the city are now on time-of-use rates, meaning they will be charged a premium when using electricity during weekday peak periods and get a discount when power is consumed overnight.

"By January we should have pretty well all residential customers on time-of-use pricing," said Blair Peberdy, vice-president of marketing and chief conservation officer at Toronto Hydro Corp. http://www.thestar.com/business/article/718395--smart-meter-phase-in-sparks-cost-fears

This phase-in seems more suited to homeowners rather than renters. Renters do not really have as much control over utilities as people who live in homes do. For example, drying laundry on balconies could be banned but homeowners with backyards could have clotheslines or drying racks for laundry items. Another thing about density housing-if you vaccuum or have kids making noise while playing at what normal are sleeping hours,you will have irate neighbours complaining or knocking on your door to keep the noise down. Also, some sounds might not be welcome at night even if electricity rates are cheaper then.

I sense that there will be a huge shift in habits but one cannot fight physiology to sleep when needed then prolong the the "awake period" to get the laundry or dishes done on cheaper rates. This is a tax grab that will hurt fixed income residents the most.
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Re: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Respect

Postby CielOnTap on Fri Apr 02, 2010 10:52 am

Even Walmart will be charging 5 cents per bag as of April 22 (Earth Day). I was leafing through the current flyer bundled with a local paper.

At least with Walmart, customers know that the store won't be using the money for a charitable donation that the store will claim. The proceeds of bag sales, less the cost of the bags, will be used on future Rollbacks on Green products. So there are three weeks to anticipate the change.
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Re: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Respect

Postby CielOnTap on Mon Apr 26, 2010 8:56 am

Plastic, glass and paper pile up as recyclers close
Slump in blue-box market leaves municipalities scrambling to find new buyers
Published On Mon Apr 26 2010
Patty Winsa
Urban Affairs Reporter
Some GTA municipalities are scrambling to find markets for blue-box materials after three major recyclers suspended operations in recent months, including a Brampton plant that was the first and only dedicated recycler of polystyrene foam in Canada.

The Canadian Polystyrene Recycling Association closed last month, for the second time in less than three years, leaving Toronto without a local end market for the foamed plastic electronics and food packaging that it began collecting at the end of 2008.

And broken glass is piling up at Toronto sorting plants after recycler Unical in Brampton closed due to financial difficulties last week. The glass processor opened in the summer of 2008 with a $1.75 million investment by industry-funded Stewardship Ontario, which shares the cost of municipal recycling programs. Toronto sends about 1,250 tons a month to the plant.http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/article/800476--plastic-glass-and-paper-pile-up-as-recyclers-close

Paper, of the newsprint variety, remains useful: liner for green compost carts, packing material for moving or shipping items, drying material for wet shoes (really works to wick water out!), quick firestarter, insulation, etc.

Those treats that come in the plastic bakery boxes are too convenient, since the boxes are not easy to recycle nor to sell to post-consumer users and manufacturers.
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Re: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Respect

Postby CielOnTap on Sat Jul 03, 2010 3:01 pm

Plastic? Not so fantastic
By SUZANNE ELSTON, Special to QMI Agency

Last Updated: July 3, 2010 12:00am
Last month California became the latest jurisdiction to ban the use of disposable grocery bags. The California ban, which will be phased in starting in 2012, was crafted by assemblywoman Julia Brownley, who cited threats to marine life as the driving force behind the legislation.

“By passing AB 1998, California will signal to the nation its commitment to wean itself from a costly single-use carryout bag habit that is threatening marine life and spoiling our waterways," said Brownley. She estimates that single use plastic bags are responsible for the injury or death of at least 267 species globally. Collecting and disposing of plastic bags cost California $ 25 million annually.

It's a trend that's increasingly gaining ground. Last year, Achim Steiner, executive director of the U.N. Environment Program called for a global ban on plastic bags.http://www.torontosun.com/life/greenplanet/2010/07/01/14580351.html
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