Busy and valuable: Bees are worth $220bln a year

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Re: Busy and valuable: Bees are worth $220bln a year

Postby CielOnTap on Thu Nov 12, 2009 9:50 pm

Three possibilities come to mind:

1) Driver error
2) Mechanical failure of some kind
3) Load tampering, if driver stopped at truck stop, causing load to shift
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Re: Busy and valuable: Bees are worth $220bln a year

Postby smitty on Fri Nov 13, 2009 5:10 pm

I would feel it was driver error more then anything else though nothing has been said, BUT we have had a lot of logging rigs, to 18 wheelers having major problems on B.C. roads, but definately not ice or snow at the very time.

Such damages to injuries to others are seeminly important to me probably because I have been driving cars to trucks up to 1 ton in size to my present Subaru 'Forester' of '06 & not the latest 'Forster' that is far, far to large to my mind, for all ov 64 yrs, with out a single accident & that includes m/cs for the same number of yrs & have been riding hot trotting sportbikes as soon as they became avaliable, to replace my street legal copies of my street bikes into road racing form, often called a Cafe Racer by the Brits, back in '48 till around '84.

To me staying alive is important to also what causes an automotive accident is most high in my prority list as to WHYand WHO. You see I do get myself in trouble in saying one should never drive a car/truck or ride a m/c once one has had any liquor, but then I am saying it with darn good reason---to proof of drinkers failing.
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Re: Busy and valuable: Bees are worth $220bln a year

Postby CielOnTap on Thu Jan 21, 2010 9:34 pm

A sweet alternative to sugar
By RITA DeMONTIS, QMI Agency

Last Updated: 19th January 2010, 5:33pm
Image
Honibe-Honey Drop.
Well, here's one sweet of a food trend — The Honibe-Honey Drop, a Canadian-made premium liquid honey in a no-mess, non-sticky handy serving size. Manufactured by Island Abbey Foods Ltd. (a 6th generation specialty food producer based in Prince Edward Island) Honibe (hon-ee-bee) brand honey is "a is a terrific alternative to the classic sugar cube — it comes in an individual serving (1 tsp. or 5g) made of 100% pure dried honey without any additives, " says company president John Rowe. "Our Honey Drop is the first of its kind in the world, ideal for sweetening tea or coffee. Simply drop into a hot beverage and stir. You have all of the natural honey flavor without the usual honey mess."http://www.torontosun.com/life/eat/2010/01/19/12530826.html

A cube of pure indulgence for a special cup of herbal tea--that is what I would use the product for. A leisurely sip and a comfortable chair. Or a bothersome cough and sore throat in need of relief would be the second occasion to break out a cube for the tea.

I have to see if the product is available in local stores.
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Re: Busy and valuable: Bees are worth $220bln a year

Postby CielOnTap on Mon May 17, 2010 11:22 am

Where's the Bee?
by Meredyth Cowling
For Niagara Magazine
For many people, bees are simply small insects, occasionally a nuisance and just part of the bucolic backdrop of summer, buzzing from flower to flower on a sunny afternoon. Bees are, in fact, rather extraordinary, and as they quietly perform their ancient roles as pollinators and producers of honey, it is these clever and hard working insects we have to thank for a full third of our food supply.

In North America, the humble honey bee helps keep our economy healthy as the mainstay of industrial agriculture, a billion-dollar-a-year industry in Canada ($15 billion in the U.S.), which pays migratory beekeepers to transport their hives around the country at blooming time.

It was no small matter then, when in 2006 the news suddenly broke that hives across North America had begun to die out. Some 30 per cent of the managed honey bee colonies disappeared in what has come to be known as colony collapse disorder, or CCD, and these startling annual losses have continued.http://www.niagaralife.com/sitepages/?aid=2084&cn=Green%20Column&an=Cowling%20on%20Green

When you go shopping for local strawberries, raspberries, blackberries and later peaches, remember that the fruits' blooms needed some attention from bees to produce the fruit you enjoy.
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Re: Busy and valuable: Bees are worth $220bln a year

Postby CielOnTap on Wed May 19, 2010 10:00 am

Beekeeping booming in Toronto
‘For people in the city, it’s the closest they’ll get to a crop’

Published On Tue May 18 2010
By Stuart Laidlaw
Living Reporter

Time was, when Greg Thomson went to parties and told people he sold beekeeping supplies in Toronto, he was guaranteed a disheartening laugh.

“I just got kind of fed up,” the manager of F.W. Jones & Son Ltd. in Downsview says now. “I’d say, ‘Yeah, beekeeping, laugh it up’.”But no more. Over the past few years, Thomson has seen his business shift from supplying commercial beekeepers outside of Toronto, to increasingly selling to Torontonians keeping a hive or two in their back yards. Or balcony, or rooftop. He’s seen them all.

Even the Canadian Opera Company is getting in on the act, with the unveiling Wednesday of two hives on the roof of its new Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts. Two years ago, the Royal York Hotel began producing its own honey. Fairmont, which owns the Royal York, has expanded the program to eight hotels around the world, including Vancouver, Washington, Kunshan in China, Mount Kenya in Africa and the Mayan Riviera in Mexico. http://www.thestar.com/living/food/article/811227--beekeeping-booming-in-toronto

The Canadian Opera Company's downtown site cannot possibly be the site for its bees--the building is mostly glass and bees do drop pollen and sticky contents. Window washers, be alert and don't wear cologne!
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Re: Busy and valuable: Bees are worth $220bln a year

Postby fishandchips on Fri Jan 07, 2011 3:07 pm

In Canada, an article did say that bees are weak because of inbreeding and lost habitat. Throw in rough weather or pests and even bees cannot take them anymore.
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Re: Busy and valuable: Bees are worth $220bln a year

Postby smitty on Fri Jan 07, 2011 9:53 pm

As an ex-Fruit orchardist so many of us paid so much to have some bee hives in our orchards with honestly that we would not spray when they were doing the job so many bees are great at.

I hope they are not lost for honest to gosh other farmers are doing the same when I ride my m/cs up into the mountains & see the same bee hives there in the hay or you name it crops they are growing.
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Re: Busy and valuable: Bees are worth $220bln a year

Postby CielOnTap on Fri Jan 07, 2011 10:06 pm

I still have a jar of honey I purchased in August-it's not fruit flavoured but I certainly want to find one at the local market next spring to try. I bought to support the market when I was on a walk through with two acquaintances. Besides, honey goes well into baked goods and basting glazes. Will try to use up the jar in the next few months.

Fishandchips mentioned bees-that item was about bumblebees being weak due to inbreeding. And here I have been supporting the people who blame cellphone towers interfering with the sun's magnetic compass in the bees.
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Re: Busy and valuable: Bees are worth $220bln a year

Postby CielOnTap on Thu Jan 05, 2012 11:07 pm

Scientific American reported on a parasitic fly that takes over the honeybees. Basically, the fly makes the honeybee its larvae incubator. The honeybee becomes a "zombie" and dies.

By chance, the connection was made when a scientist noticed that dead bees in a vial had fly matter attached to it.

Colony collapse is a major concern for the bee industry for several years now.
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Re: Busy and valuable: Bees are worth $220bln a year

Postby CielOnTap on Sat Oct 06, 2012 7:10 pm

What happens when bees feast on bad candy? They produce coloured honey that cannot be sold.
Bees make colourful honey after dipping into candy

October 5, 2012 — Bees have been creating blue, green and purple honey in northeastern France after stopping into a nearby plant processing M&M's candy waste.

Since August, bees in the town of Ribeauville have been feasting on "unidentified colourful substances", causing their honey to turn shades of green, blue and purple.

The colourful contaminants come from a nearby factory that has been processing M&M's candy waste.

While the substance tastes like honey, beekeepers have had to dispose of the concoction.
http://www.theweathernetwork.com/news/storm_watch_stories3&stormfile=Bees_make_blue_and_green_honey_after_dipping_into_candy_05_10_2012?ref=ccbox_weather_category2
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