Raw Food Pet Diet vs Commercial

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Raw Food Pet Diet vs Commercial

Postby deja vu on Sun Sep 07, 2014 1:05 pm

Karen Schiavone grabs a heavy box of raw meat patties from her store’s massive freezer. "There’s 42 patties of chicken dinner, four patties of lamb, two patties of duck, and two salmon," she says as she plunks the box down in front of her customer.

Her furry customer tries to sniff out the contents. Tetsuo is a Bernese Mountain Dog and he’s doing the raw food diet.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/raw-foo ... -1.2756938

Right now I have 2 cats and they eat a specialty Dental Kibble and a commercial brand of moist canned food. I have had dogs and cats before and back then it wasn't on anyone's radar. No one even thought about raw over commercial, now many are looking deeper into the subject.

Specialty Vet kibbles are costly compared to store brand kibbles and can't argue the fact that some of the ingredients in both are impossible to pronounce and we have no idea what they are. Can't argue that corn doesn't belong in pet food, it's just a filler and pets can have an allergic reaction to it or the other additives in the commercial brands.

He believes the diet is in fact downright dangerous and he’s hardly alone. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently issued a warning that "raw pet food was more likely to be contaminated with disease-causing bacteria." The pathogens can include salmonella and listeria and, according to Joffe, find their way into a home no matter how carefully an owner handles raw meat.


We can say that about food that Humans consume as well. Many documented cases of the same problem and people dying from it, no matter how carefully we handle it. So what is a pet owner to do? I think that the USFDA is wise to remind people that it can happen in pet and human food and they can't stress it enough to take precautions when handling raw meat/fish. I think some vets and commercial food companies are seeing the trend shifting to the raw diet and only worried about their almighty bank account, nothing more.

I can see the benefits to the raw diet, and will do some research into it. Human and pet food is so processed, and the nutritional value is slipping. Food allergies are forcing the public to rethink their diet and their pets. If I like what I see, I would consider giving it a try with my cats.

Here are the ingredients in my cat's dental kibble -

Chicken By-Product Meal, Brewers Rice, Corn Gluten Meal, Whole Grain Corn, Powdered Cellulose, Pork Fat, Chicken Liver Flavor, Calcium Sulfate, Lactic Acid, Soybean Oil, Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, DL-Methionine, vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of vitamin C), Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Taurine, Iodized Salt, Calcium Carbonate, minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Mixed Tocopherols for freshness, Phosphoric Acid, Beta-Carotene, Natural Flavors.


Here are the ingredients in a can of moist fish cat food -

Fish, poultry by-products, water sufficient for processing, meat by-products, liver, rice, shrimp, artificial and natural flavors, added color (Red 3 and other color), guar gum, calcium phosphate, potassium chloride, salt, carrageenan, magnesium sulfate, choline chloride, taurine, Vitamin E supplement, thiamine mononitrate, zinc sulfate, ferrous sulfate, niacin, sodium nitrite (to promote color retention), calcium pantothenate, Vitamin A supplement, copper sulfate, manganese sulfate, menadione sodium bisulfite complex (source of Vitamin K activity), pyridoxine hydrochloride, riboflavin supplement, Vitamin B-12 supplement, biotin, folic acid, Vitamin D-3 supplement, potassium iodide. B-6051


I have been trying to find out what B-6051 is, but having no luck so far.
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Re: Raw Food Pet Diet vs Commercial

Postby deja vu on Sun Sep 07, 2014 4:04 pm

I contacted the lady and here is part 1 of the reply.

Thanks for your inquiry… Here are some tips:

1) Transitioning cats to raw can be difficult as you may already know. I follow a vet, Dr. Karen Becker, from the US who suggests switching the cats to canned food before switching the cats to raw to ease the transition. I have included some of her suggestions in an attachment to this email. She also has authored a cookbook if you have any interest in making your own, or just reading more about her take on real food for cats. (She does suggest no cat should ever be on kibble - it is too dry for them and they require at least the hydration of a canned food, although she would prefer to see them fed a raw, real food diet.)

2) I believe ground bones are an essential ingredient in the food but cats shouldn’t get too, too much. For the teeth especially: bone is an excellent source of calcium and phosphorous.

3) Rotation is key: for them and for us! It balances nutritional needs - no single food is perfect and by mixing it up it smooths out the highs and the lows. Turkey, and chicken are two examples of meals which tend to have a high bone content in their pure form - they can be fed in moderation but should be fed in rotation with other proteins. One of our Ontario manufacturers, Big Country Raw, suggests that in addition to their “Turkey and Beef / Feline Formula”, for example, cats do well with their breeders blend formula (a mix of chicken and beef), as well as their pure formulas including pure beef, pure lamb,pure pork, turkey / salmon / lamb, pure rabbit, and pure duck.

4) Raw meaty bones - you read right - raw meaty bones! Chewing on a bone is a great thing for cats as well as dogs.

5) Cats are obligate carnivores and require just animal protein so fruit and veg are not necessary to their diet.

6) The products you choose should also contain organ in addition to the meat and bone.

Here is a website that you might find some additional information from dedicated exclusively to cats:

http://felineinstincts.com/



I contacted her a second time for more information on the idea of cats having a bone to chew on:

Here are some bones you might try: duck necks, chicken necks, chicken feet, duck feet. Not cooked of course! And all food for cats, including bones should be at room temperature. Food left in the fridge for more than a day or two might have them turn up their noses at you as well!
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Re: Raw Food Pet Diet vs Commercial

Postby deja vu on Sun Sep 07, 2014 4:08 pm

Part 2 -

Here are some tips from Dr. Karen Becker’s book: Real Food for Healthy Dogs & Cats: Successful Switching to Raw for Cats.

The optimum diet for most cats is a well--‐balanced, meat based raw diet. If your cat is really opposed to raw, try cooking their meals. The above book by Dr. Becker includes recipes for how to provide balanced nutrition you choose to make it yourself. The worst choice for cats and their kidneys is dry food, even if the ingredients are impeccable. Cats need food that contains water.

A total switch to the desired diet can often be accomplished in a week, but sometimes it can take three months or longer to switch. Dry foods are designed to be tasty, and many cats are addicted to the salt and fat included. Cats are not always open to the idea of variety, especially if they have only been fed one food.

Cats are not good candidates for "tough love" - they will starve themselves. Cats must eat daily - a slow switch will help prevent problems. That is why creativity and patience are key.



1. Eliminate free feeding!

They are much more receptive to new food if they are hungry. Every time your cat strolls by the food dish, the smell of food makes his system think it’s about to get food, starting the digestive process. This is not a healthy practice, and you will have less success switching to real food. Better to establish regular feeding times and put the food away between feedings.

2. Most cats do well with two meals a day:

Start with two meals a day of their regular food and a snack of real food. **Kittens should be fed frequently as babies and less as they mature.Older cats and ill or recovering cats sometimes do better with the calculated daily amount of food fed frequently.

3. If all is well, increase, but start taking out some of the old food.

4. Because canned food and raw food have the same consistency, moving the cat to canned from kibble, and then to raw from canned might work best.

5. Start slowly. Mixing ¼ teaspoon of a new food into a meal, and increasing gradually will help ensure long term success. Cats have very long memories so if you go too quickly this may be problematic.

6. Offer bits of fresh food that you are eating. They may refuse, but one day they won’t. The goal is to get the cat to consider eating foods other than dry crunchy items.

7. Always serve the food at room temperature. Cats choose food by smell. Do not let it sit in fridge or on the floor for too long or the cat may reject it. Warming food releases the flavors and aromas.

8. Provide balance by rotating at least three proteins. Each new protein may need to be introduced slowly employing the same techniques as when first switching to raw.

9. Feed multiple cats separately – you need to know who is eating what. Put the food on your plate, or hide it in a forbidden location. Trickery sometimes works with cats. Many cats come to real food diets because they have GI problems from diarrhea to Inflammatory Bowel Disease or allergies and skin problems. Cats with unhealthy guts may not do well on raw food initially.Don’t give up! Cook for to start with (do not cook food with whole or ground bones as bones will become brittle and could be dangerous for your pet). Food can be a miracle cure but frequently there are bumps
in the road and a holistic practitioner can help a lot.
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